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Programming 

The most up-to-date schedule is available at https://pharmed17.pathable.com or via the Pharmacy Education 2017 App which can be downloaded from either the Play Store (Android) or the App Store (Apple).

Days:

Friday, July 14

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: Registration Desk

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

8:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: WebAdMIT Best Practices

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

Roundtable discussions on best practices in WebAdMIT will be facilitated by members of the PharmCAS Advisory Committee and Liaison customer service. Topics include: 1) Configuration Portal—what did you learn?; 2) communicating prerequisite requirements in the program materials page to applicants; 3) report manager and export manager; 4) WebAdMIT: it’s time you went paperless; 5) using WebAdMIT to manage the Cooperative Admissions Guidelines; and 6) does my workflow flow?

8:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: WebAdMIT Training for New Users

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

First time and beginner PharmCAS/PharmGrad/PharmDirect users and any admissions teams who do not use WebAdMIT for admission processing, this session is for you! This session will cover the basics of how to access applicant information, how to set admissions decisions, and how to utilize the configuration portal. Basic applicant processing techniques will also be covered.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Clutter, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Nicole Iarossi, Liaison International

9:15 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Admissions Workshop Beverage Break

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

10:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: PharmCAS Policy Review

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

AACP staff will share preliminary cycle data and provide an overview of PharmCAS policies.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, AACP; (Speaker) Katie C. Owings, AACP; (Speaker) Thomas TenHoeve III, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Andrea L. Wall, University of Cincinnati

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Admissions Workshop: PharmCAS Future Plans

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

PharmCAS staff will provide an overview of updates for the 2017–2018 application cycle.

(Speaker) Karen Jacobs, Liaison International

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Lunch

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Private lunch for Admissions Workshop participants only.

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Use of a Multi-Disciplinary Task Force to Increase Recruitment and Retention Throughout the Admissions Process

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

This session will focus on the development and activities of a multidisciplinary task force focused on recruitment, admissions, and retention. The task force was charged and funded to recommend, prioritize, and implement new and creative initiatives that would improve recruitment and retention of admitted students.

(Speaker) Shauna M. Buring, University of Florida; (Speaker) Stacey Curtis, University of Florida

2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: National Pipeline Recruitment Plan Update

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

This session will provide an update on the AACP National Pipeline Recruitment Plan and will explore how member institutions can meet the challenges of communicating and recruiting in a competitive educational environment.

(Speaker) Jennifer L. Adams, AACP; (Speaker) Kyle Sousa, West Coast University

2:50 p.m.–3:10 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Beverage Break

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

3:10 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Diamonds in the Rough: Admitting a Diverse Student Body

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

In this session, we will discuss the challenges that come with admitting a minority majority class, including traditionally at-risk students. We will discuss holistic admissions considerations, admissions concerns and student support. We will also review our success with working with a diverse student body.

(Speaker) Donald A. Godwin, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Krystal McCutchen, The University of New Mexico

4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

Please check-in for Pharmacy Education 2017 and pick-up your name badge here. We are also available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app, and help you get started with AACP Connect. Discover the new online, private community exclusively for members to communicate and collaborate with each other in a virtual home. Learn how to create your profile, post to a discussion board, upload documents, and much more using AACP Connect.

4:10 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Utilizing First-Year Pharmacy Student Peer Mentors to Enhance Recruitment & Admissions Initiatives

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

This session will discuss how Husson University's School of Pharmacy initiated a peer mentor program using pharmacy students to enhance its recruitment and admissions initiatives. The presentation will focus on how the program has evolved over the past five years, the role of student peer mentors in the recruitment, admissions interview and orientation processes, initial challenges encountered, and measured successes.

(Speaker) Kristen Card, Husson University; (Speaker) Conrad Dhing, Husson University

5:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Reception

Water's Edge, Delta Atrium

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

Join us for a reception hosted by Pearson, the administrator of PCAT.
Liaison Logo

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

PharmCAS Advisory Committee Meeting

Ryman Studio PQR, Level 0

Closed Meeting

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

PharmGrad Advisory Committee Meeting

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Closed Meeting

7:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

PharmCAS & PharmGrad Advisory Committee Dinner

Offsite: Rain Forest Café

Closed Meeting

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Saturday, July 15

7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Walmart Scholars Orientation

Presidential Ballroom AB, Level 2

Required session for the AACP Walmart Scholars, so that they may make the most of their experience at the Annual Meeting.

(Moderator) Jennifer L. Adams, AACP; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, AACP

7:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

Please check-in for Pharmacy Education 2017 and pick-up your name badge here. We are also available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app, and help you get started with AACP Connect. Discover the new online, private community exclusively for members to communicate and collaborate with each other in a virtual home. Learn how to create your profile, post to a discussion board, upload documents, and much more using AACP Connect.

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Teachers Seminar Breakfast

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Private breakfast for Teachers Seminar participants only.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: PCAT Score Interpretation: A Case-Based Workshop

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

Members of the PCAT Advisory Committee will discuss ongoing changes to the PCAT and provide a case-based workshop on how PCAT results can be interpreted in conjunction with other applicant data. They will also discuss research and future opportunities with how the Workplace Personality Inventory may be used at admissions and beyond.

(Moderator) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University; (Speaker) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Ann M. Philbrick, University of Minnesota

8:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

ACPE CPE Modified Administrator Workshop

Ryman Ballroom ABDE, Level 0

Separate registration required: www.acpe-accredit.org.

Join us for the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) CPE Continuing Education Administrator Workshop! This 5-hour workshop is designed to provide a working knowledge of the ACPE accreditation process as it relates to continuing pharmacy education, including training and group activities on the ACPE Standards for Continuing Pharmacy Education, and Policies and Procedures. The workshop also strives to offer opportunities for networking with other ACPE-accredited providers.

8:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Teachers Seminar: Learning is NOT a Spectator Sport: Active Learning in Pharmacy Curricula: Keynote: Active Learning for Engagement and Meaning

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Fee: $225 (Student: $125). Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes continental breakfast, lunch, and beverage breaks.

Participants will explore the definition and development of active learning activities, their incorporation into all areas of pharmacy curricula, assessment and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Through a series of TED-like talks, small group discussion and other active learning exercises, participants will leave with new ideas and strategies for inclusion in their courses.

(Moderator) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Beth E. Welch, Western New England University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define active learning.
  2. Describe why active learning strategies are important in pharmacy education.
  3. Identify challenges to using active learning and solutions to overcome them.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-032-L04-P, 1.0 Contact Hours)

8:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Joseph T. DiPiro Excellence in Publishing Workshop

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Introductory

Fee: $75. Pre-registration recommended, limited space available.

This workshop provides authors with an overview of the essentials of excellence when submitting manuscripts to AJPE, the scholarly, peer-reviewed publication of AACP. This year’s workshop will include new and improved handouts reflecting recent changes to the Journal’s author instructions and article categories. It will also include an extended breakout session during which authors can discuss specific issues with the editors of AJPE.

(Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, University of New England; (Speaker) Nancy Fjortoft, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Lauren S. Schlesselman, University of Connecticut

9:30 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Teachers Seminar Morning Beverage Break

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

9:30 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

Admissions Workshop Beverage Break

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

9:45 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Teachers Seminar: Learning is NOT a Spectator Sport: Active Learning in Pharmacy Curricula: Morning Session

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Fee: $225 (Student: $125). Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes continental breakfast, lunch, and beverage breaks.

Explore active learning in various areas of the curriculum through a series of TED-like talks and active learning exercises. Speakers will address the incorporation of active learning in pharmacy curricula in the areas of basic sciences, pharmacy practice, social and administrative sciences and simulation.

(Moderator) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Andrea S. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Srikanth Kolluru, Keck Graduate Institute; (Speaker) Lourdes G. Planas, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the use of high fidelity human patient simulation, simulated electronic health records, and communication avatars in pharmacy education and discover innovative approaches to enhancing patient-centered care skills in pharmacy education.
  2. Identify the extent to which faculty possess characteristics commonly attributed to Millennials and explore strategies to heighten student self-awareness.
  3. Describe the role of perspective taking when discussing cases that involve multiple generations and strategies of perspective taking in an intergenerational workplace.
  4. Discuss pros and cons of specific active learning techniques and how they might be used in pharmacy education and formulate a plan to incorporate active learning into your teaching.
  5. Explain the need for integrating between basic and clinical sciences content and describe how to introduce the design of an active learning exercise to integrate curricular content.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-035-L04-P, 2.00 Contact Hours)

9:50 a.m.–10:50 a.m.

Admissions Workshop: A Strategic Enrollment Management Approach is Key to a Successful Digital Marketing Strategy

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

The general higher education recruitment landscape has changed dramatically, and pharmacy education is facing additional recruitment pressures. Whether you are part of a larger university system or an independent college, institutions are developing and implementing strategic enrollment management (SEM) frameworks and plans, working to exert control over enrollments and improve retention. In this session, we will discuss how a data-driven SEM approach can inform your marketing strategy, and how you can utilize sharable content on your website and social channels to promote the profession and attract prospective students with the characteristics you have identified for success.

(Speaker) Elizabeth Keserauskis, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

11:00 a.m.–Noon

Admissions Workshop: Student Retention: An Admissions Issue

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

This session will provide insight and overview of the ways Admissions Offices can collaborate with other departments to ameliorate retention, attrition and completion.

(Speaker) Nazach Rodriguez-Snapp, University of South Florida; (Speaker) Jeremy Turkall, University of South Florida

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Lunch

Presidential Ballroom AB, Level 2

Private lunch for Teachers Seminar participants only.

Noon–1:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Lunch

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Private lunch for Admissions Workshop participants only.

Noon–5:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Presidential Chamber B, Level 2

Sponsored by Liaison International
Liaison Logo

Make time to stop by the complimentary R&R Lounge to unwind, check your e-mail and charge your phone, tablet or laptop. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment.

12:45 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Teachers Seminar: Learning is NOT a Spectator Sport: Active Learning in Pharmacy Curricula: Afternoon Session

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Fee: $225 (Student: $125). Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes continental breakfast, lunch, and beverage breaks.

Speakers in this session will continue the dialogue by exploring the scholarship of teaching and learning related to active learning, creating effective exercises for individuals and teams and assessment methods.

(Moderator) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Patrick Chan, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Doreen Pon, Western University of Health Sciences

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify one example during your lecture in which students can role-play as the patient to enhance their empathy toward patients.
  2. Identify a series of related topics in your area of teaching in which one longitudinal patient case can be employed.
  3. Identify one example during your lecture in which students can practice application of material using their personal data to enhance student engagement.
  4. Define an assessment rubric, then contrast the assessment of lower level and higher level active learning.
  5. Assess a teaching example using a teaching rubric.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-034-L04-P, 1.5 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Assessing Social Media Use by U.S. Pharmacy Schools

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

Social media has become an important tool for pharmacy schools to engage the community, current students, alumni, and prospective students. Universities may be aware of the potential advantages of utilizing social media for marketing and communications, but use may not be optimized by pharmacy schools. This session will present a review of the current use of social media by pharmacy schools. Our research into social media included a survey of pharmacy school Student Affairs and Admissions Officers and an analysis of existing social media use by 135 U.S. pharmacy schools. Join us for a discussion about current trends and future possibilities for optimizing social media use in pharmacy school education.

(Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Bradi L. Frei, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Cheryl K. Horlen, University of the Incarnate Word

1:00 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Early Career Faculty Program: Strategies for Grant-Writing Success

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Introductory

Fee: $75. Pre-registration is recommended, limited space available.

Today’s research funding landscape can be challenging, so give yourself the best chance for success with a high caliber grant proposal. This interactive workshop is intended for faculty members who have limited experience in research proposal development, preparation, and submission. Speakers from several disciplines share their tips and tricks for how to craft a strong proposal, and a program officer discusses what common mistakes to avoid when submitting a grant. Participants are highly encouraged to bring a copy of a proposal they are developing or ideas for proposals to develop in order to receive feedback and guidance during breakout sessions.

(Speaker) Kirsten F. Block, AACP; (Speaker) Andrew Coop, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Sarah S. Garber, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Daniel R. Touchette, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Siu-Fun Wong, Chapman University

1:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

School Poster Session

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Name Badge Required

Extended earlier hours to view posters with presenter attendance recommended from 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m. This year's theme is Assessing Student Achievement of CAPE Domain 4.

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

CPD for Faculty, Preceptors and Students: Engagement in Self-Directed Lifelong Learning

Ryman Ballroom ABDE, Level 0

Separate registration required: www.acpe-accredit.org.

Join us for an engaging session that will describe the concepts and components of a continuing professional development (CPD) approach to self-directed lifelong learning as it relates to the spectrum of education from student to practitioner. Methods and tools to advance CPD for faculty, preceptors and students will be shared, and participants will apply principles in creating a personal development plan. Plans for a CPD online platform will be discussed and feedback sought.

2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Retrospective Analysis of Diverse Attributes in Student Stories

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

Examination of P1 students who were not academic successfully as defined by scholastic progression rules led to a retrospective analysis of more diverse attributes in student pharmacists. Investigation of specific student background factors based upon a more holistic approach allows for admission of a more diverse student body and identification of incoming students who needed greater support earlier on.

(Speaker) Angie Choi, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Schwanda K. Flowers, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

2:15 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Afternoon Beverage Break

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

2:30 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Teachers Seminar: Learning is NOT a Spectator Sport: Active Learning in Pharmacy Curricula: Summary and Wrap Up

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Fee: $225 (Student: $125). Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes continental breakfast, lunch, and beverage breaks.

A wrap up of the day’s teaching sessions will be presented. Further discussion amongst attendees will provide opportunities to identify potential areas for both small and large active learning activities for attendees.

(Moderator) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Patrick Chan, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Doreen Pon, Western University of Health Sciences

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the concepts presented and discussed throughout the workshop.
  2. Discuss steps they will take to implement the tools and activities learned at the Teachers Seminar.
  3. Identify a network of colleagues to support them in implementing the activities and/or changes proposed.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-033-L04-P, .75 Contact Hours)

2:50 p.m.–3:10 p.m.

Admissions Workshop Beverage Break

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

3:10 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Leveraging Diversity to Build Our Declining Pipeline

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

This session will enable program participants to learn how 2016 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Schools of Pharmacy Award recipients increase diversity and utilize diversity as a strategy to address the declining pharmacy pipeline.

(Moderator) Jeffrey G. Jurkas, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Amy Diepenbrock, University of the Incarnate Word; (Speaker) Donald A. Godwin, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Clara U. Okorie-Awe, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Carla Y. White, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

New Faculty/First Timers Annual Meeting Orientation

Presidential Ballroom AB, Level 2

Attendees are invited to a session to share, learn and network with colleagues about the wonderful opportunities available during the AACP Annual Meeting.

(Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, AACP; (Speaker) Ruth E. Nemire, AACP

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Council of Faculties Administrative Board Meeting

Washington A, Level M

The elected leaders of the Council of Faculties will meet.

(Chair) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Administrative Board Meeting

Lincoln B, Level M

Closed Meeting

The elected leaders of the Council of Deans will meet.

(Chair) Natalie D. Eddington, University of Maryland

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Council of Sections Business Meeting

Jackson CD, Level M

Closed business meeting of the Council of Sections members, consisting of the section chairs, chairs-elect, and immediate past chairs. Section secretaries are also invited to attend.

(Chair) Schwanda K. Flowers, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Council of Ohio Colleges of Pharmacy Meeting

Jackson EF, Level M

The quarterly meeting of the Council of Ohio Colleges of Pharmacy to address recruitment, NAPLEX preparation and other key topics.

3:45 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

Graduate Student Program: Management & Leadership Tools and Strategies For New Team Leaders

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Introductory

Leading successful teams requires a combination of management and leadership skills that are grounded in an understanding of human nature and how individuals with different personalities, motivations, backgrounds and diverse values can collaborate. Today’s team leaders must have knowledge and skills that go beyond those needed in the industrial age when work was linear, change slower, and the mix of generations and cultures less challenging. Students, residents, fellows and faculty are invited to attend this interactive workshop.

(Speaker) Erik C. Burns, University of Wisconsin–Madison

4:10 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Admissions Workshop: Making the Most of Your Interview Day

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1, Level 0

Fee: $350. Pre-registration recommended, space is limited. Registration includes two lunches, a reception on Friday, and beverage breaks.

Tips on ways to make sure that you gathering the information you need to make your admission decisions, and your applicants are also receiving the information they need, while having an enjoyable experience on your campus. This helps applicants to know that your program is the right choice to meet their educational and experiential needs.

(Speaker) Jonathan M. Parker, Samford University

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Catholic Pharmacists Mass

Ryman Ballroom CF, Level 0

Everyone is welcome!

(Moderator) Edward M. DeSimone II, Creighton University

4:45 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Junior Faculty Roundtable Networking Session

Presidential Ballroom AB, Level 2

Join the Council of Faculties Junior Faculty Community for roundtable networking and discussion on various topics for those starting or early in their academic career.

(Moderator) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Visiting Librarians Welcome

Jackson AB, Level M

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

All interested section members and officers are welcome to this meeting with Grace and Harold Sewell Fund Stipend recipients. New members will have an orientation to AACP Annual Meeting programs and events. Instruction and information regarding requirements for the stipend recipients will be provided.

(Moderator) Leslie A. Bowman, University of the Sciences; (Chair) Skye Bickett, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Highlighting #RxInnovation: Postcards to Your Legislators

Tennessee Registration Desk, Level 2

Feeling frustrated about the dwindling appreciation for research and STEM education on Capitol Hill? Want to make your voice heard but don’t know where to start? Now you can join the conversation on the pivotal role that research at colleges and schools of pharmacy plays in moving the health research enterprise forward. AACP staff will be on hand to help you craft your message, and you’ll be able to write a postcard to your legislator that shares your story of pharmacy research impacting lives for the better.

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Welcome Reception

Tennessee Ballroom, Level 2

Name Badge Required

7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

ALFP Cohort 13 Commencement Celebration

Ryman Ballroom ABDE, Level 0

Dinner and graduation commencement for the Fellows of ALFP Cohort 13.

(Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, AACP

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Sunday, July 16

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

ALFP Alumni Breakfast

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

By Invitation Only.

The ALFP Alumni Breakfast provides the opportunity for former Fellows from Cohorts 1 through 13 to meet, socialize and catch-up with each other.

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Prayer Breakfast

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Limited Seating.

Grab your continental breakfast and join us for the prayer breakfast.

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

First House of Delegates Sign-In

Tennessee Registration Desk, Level 2

All delegates are required to sign in on Sunday and Wednesday so the Credentials Committee can determine the quorum for business.

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Networking Rooms 1, 2 and 3

Presidential Boardroom A, Level M; Ryman Studios D and E, Level 0

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the Registration and Help Desk.

7:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

Please check-in for Pharmacy Education 2017 and pick-up your name badge here. We are also available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app, and help you get started with AACP Connect. Discover the new online, private community exclusively for members to communicate and collaborate with each other in a virtual home. Learn how to create your profile, post to a discussion board, upload documents, and much more using AACP Connect.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Opening General Session: Building Bridges in a Dynamic, Ever-Changing Health Care Environment

Presidential Ballroom CDE, Level 2

Introductory

Kevin E. Lofton is the chief executive officer of Englewood, Colorado-based Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI). He joined CHI in 1998 and has served as CEO since 2003. Mr. Lofton is widely recognized at the national level as an experienced healthcare executive whose background includes top positions in public, university, community and faith-based hospitals, including serving as the chief executive officer of the UAB and Howard University Hospitals.

Mr. Lofton will kick-off the Annual Meeting with a dynamic discussion of his health-systems leadership experience, reflecting on the amount and direction of change as the U.S. strives to embrace value and performance as key tenets of patient-centered healthcare delivery, and the inclusion of pharmacists and pharmacy as we move from volume to value.

AACP President Joseph T. DiPiro will share strategic milestones on the work of the Association and present the Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award, the Lifetime Achievement Award and the Distinguished Teaching Scholar Awards.

(Moderator) Joseph T. DiPiro, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Kevin E. Lofton, Catholic Health Initiatives

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the amount and direction of current changes in the U.S. health care system.
  2. Describe the impact of value and performance as key tenets of patient-centered health care delivery.
  3. Identify opportunities for pharmacists and pharmacy in the current climate of change.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-030-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Presidential Chamber B, Level 2

Sponsored by Liaison International
Liaison Logo

Make time to stop by the complimentary R&R Lounge to unwind, check your e-mail and charge your phone, tablet or laptop. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment.

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouses/Guests Hospitality Room

Washington A, Level M

9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) Foundation Information Desk

Presidential Lobby, Level 2

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Headshot Café

Tennessee Lobby A, Level 2

Sponsored by Rite Aid
Rite Aid Logo

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: Continuing Pharmacy Education (CPE): Planning Pearls

Jackson CD, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section

With heightened interest in developing CPD programs, many colleges and schools of pharmacy are looking to implement and develop CPE. This 30-minute interactive session will discuss pearls in planning CPE. This session will focus on logistics of coordinating for CPE including searching for vendors, fulfilling the need for AV equipment, accounting for food service, etc.

(Speaker) Emily Chan, Touro University California; (Speaker) Adrian Wong Touro University California

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Layering Is In!—A Layered Learner Model for Innovative Introductory Practice Experiences

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 emphasize the need for colleges of pharmacy to develop introductory experiential practice educational offerings that provide students authentic opportunities to engage in interprofessional practice, shared decision making, and direct patient care. Employing a layered learner model may be an efficient method to achieve these objectives and contribute to professional development. Session participants will collaborate to identify and explore opportunities and barriers to implement innovative early longitudinal experiential education.

(Speaker) Tera McIntosh, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Stacy Taylor, University of Kentucky

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Chemistry Section: Cofactors and Hormones: I’ll Take Vitamins for 200!

Jackson EF, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Chemistry Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group

This session will highlight select vitamins (cofactors, antioxidants, or hormones) frequently sought by consumers from natural sources, as well as from over-the-counter supplements for various therapeutic uses. Biochemical value, potential drug-nutrient interactions, nutrient-disease state requirements, and perceived value in augmenting or negating prescription drug management of select disease states will be presented. IOM recommendations, food processing stability, and dietary restrictions as it applies to supplement choice will also be discussed. Audience: health conscious individuals.

(Moderator) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Marc W. Harrold, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

First House of Delegates Session

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

All Annual Meeting attendees are welcome to come and hear reports from AACP leaders and guests, including incoming President Steven A. Scott's remarks. Candidates for the office of President-elect will be introduced during the session and an initial report on the business before the House will be provided by the Bylaws & Policy Development Committee.

(Speaker of the House) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University; (President-elect) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Experiences With Curricular Mapping and Summative Assessments In Patient Care Laboratory Sequences

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

This session for laboratory instructors is designed to illustrate methods to structure a laboratory course sequence while mapping to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) standards, Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) and more. A panel of presenters will share various laboratory course structures and methods for assessing student readiness for advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). The participants will have an opportunity to map their own laboratory activities to EPAs to demonstrate the methods discussed.

(Moderator) Karen R. Sando, University of Florida; (Chair) Krista L. Donohoe, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Jaime Riskin, Nova Southeastern University; (Speaker) Jennifer A. Henriksen, Manchester University; (Speaker) Susanne G. Barnett, University of Wisconsin–Madison

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Map intentionally designed laboratory activities and final skills assessments to institutional specific core elements and accreditation standards.
  2. Identify barriers and limitations to the development of a final skills laboratory assessment and methods for overcoming difficulties in the process.
  3. Examine how learning activities within a skills laboratory may be used to evaluate Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) readiness.
  4. Map a skills laboratory course (including all learning activities) to program competencies and Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs).

Application-based (0581-0000-17-073-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Minority Faculty SIG: Standing Up for Diversity and Inclusion: Pharmacy Efforts in Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Minority Faculty Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

This interactive session is designed to raise awareness on the lack of literature on diversity in pharmacy, share strategies on how to increase diversity in the academic setting, and promote understanding on the intersectionality of identities and its pivotal role in inclusive excellence. This session is designed for individuals who want to learn best practices to recruit underrepresented students as well as how to be inclusive leaders at their institutions through understanding intersectionality and dominance.

(Speaker) Nicole D. Avant, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) Clara U. Okorie-Awe, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Antonio Bush, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the literature in diversity and inclusive excellence in pharmacy.
  2. Articulate the strategies used by the national 2016 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity award winner, the University of Illinois at Chicago, to increase pharmacy enrollment of black and Latino students.
  3. Define intersectionality, as well as dominance, and their roles in inclusion.
  4. Reflect on characteristics of their group identities to build self-awareness.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-074-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–4:15 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Meeting

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

The Administrative and Financial Officers (AFO) SIG program is designed for administrative and financial officers as well as other AACP participants interested in key administrative issues impacting the operations of colleges of pharmacies. As more and more colleges of pharmacy struggle with the current economic climate, many of us are exploring alternative revenue sources. At the annual meeting the SIG will host several sessions on current and new revenue sources with a particular focus on the administrative and financial aspects to consider.

(Chair) William J. Cooper, University of Maryland

10:00 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG: The Future of Academic Clinical Pharmacies

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

As more and more Colleges of Pharmacy struggle with the current economic climate, many of us are relying on our clinical pharmacies as alternative revenue sources. As we consider options such as Specialty Pharmacies, 340B programs, and other programs to enhance our clinical revenue, this session will examine the future of our academic clinical pharmacies. With changes from the Affordable Care Act and managed care plans, stiff competition of specialty pharmacies, and increased scrutiny of drug pricing practices, what can we expect from our clinical pharmacies. This session will include speakers from several Academic Clinical Pharmacies who will discuss the challenges around the 340B program, specialty pharmacies, and other factors influencing the financial solvency of our clinical programs.

(Chair) William J. Cooper, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Sandra Durley, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Gina Moore, University of Colorado Denver; (Speaker) JoAnn Stubbings, University of Illinois at Chicago

10:00 a.m.–4:15 p.m.

Development Directors SIG

Ryman Studio HI, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Development Directors Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with full conference registration)

The Development Directors SIG plans to review best practices at academic institutions coupled with discussions among participants. Topics include: Strategic planning; Development officer roles; Planned giving; Alumni involvement and engagement (recent graduates and existing alumni); Engagement of faculty, administration, and staff; Finding new donors; Price points for endowing a gift (Endowed chairs, professorships, lectureships, & scholarships); and Metrics used to measure outcomes (e.g., calls and asks a month). A business meeting will also be held to review SIG goals and outcomes and initiate new officers.

(Chair) D. Rex Urice, The University of Oklahoma

10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

NACDS Foundation Innovative Research Row

Presidential Lobby, Level 2

In partnership with our lead investigators, the National Association of Chain Drugs Stores (NACDS) Foundation is pleased to present posters detailing our ongoing research projects. Come see our line-up of patient care pilots, from innovative care delivery models to preventive screenings – promising concepts that can be replicated and scaled into real-world solutions. With a focus on accessibility, efficiency, and promoting the safe and effective use of medicine, the NACDS Foundation supports evidence-based research designed to find new ways to care.

10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 1

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Edward M. DeSimone II, Creighton University

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Faculty and Preceptor Development: An Interprofessional Objective Structured Teaching Experience Simulation

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section

An objective structured teaching experience (OSTE) simulation is a faculty development pedagogy to practice and receive coaching on teaching/precepting performance. At our institution the OSTE focused on interprofessional precepting skills to support interprofessional efforts on IPPEs/APPEs. Development of faculty/preceptors is needed to enhance the experience of interprofessional learners in clinical environments. Participants will learn about the development of an OSTE to enhance interprofessional precepting and role-modeling skills.

(Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Women Faculty SIG Luncheon and Business Meeting

Washington B, Level M

Intended Audience: Women Faculty Special Interest Group

Fee: $50; limited availability. Ticket and Name Badge Required

This year’s Women Faculty SIG luncheon will focus on a facilitated discussion of the book club disseminated at last year’s luncheon, Getting Past NO: Negotiating in Difficult Situations, by William Ury. It will also feature a presentation by a leader in academic pharmacy with a focus on the importance of negotiation. Business of the SIG will also be conducted.

(Moderator) Tonja M. Woods, University of Wyoming; (Chair) Elena M. Umland, Thomas Jefferson University; (Speaker) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

ALFP Dean Mentors/Leadership Facilitators Luncheon

Jackson AB, Level M

By Invitation Only

The ALFP Dean Mentor/Leadership Facilitators Luncheon serves as an opportunity for Cohort 14 Dean Mentors and Cohort 13 and 14 Leadership Facilitators to discuss their roles and responsibilities and exchange ideas as participants in the ALFP program.

(Moderator) Ruth E. Nemire, AACP

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Prep Advisory Committee Meeting

Ryman Studio JK, Level 0

Closed committee meeting.

(Chair) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Teacher of the Year Luncheon

Sponsored by Walmart Stores – Health & Wellness:
Walmart Logo

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

By Invitation Only

11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG Lunch and Roundtable

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

Despite the different types of schools and programs we all come from, each of us face similar challenges in the administrative and financial arenas. These breakout sessions will give each individual an opportunity to network and engage with other administrative colleagues to discuss issues that impact all of us. The Lunch/Breakout session provides a round-robin opportunity for us to focus on these pressing issues.

Table Topics: How are Schools of Pharmacy using data metrics to improve the bottom line?; Funds flow models with hospital/partners; Residency programs; Rotations; Clinical Services; and School owned pharmacies.

(Chair) William J. Cooper, University of Maryland

12:30 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Development Directors SIG Lunch

Ryman Studio HI, Level 0

Private lunch for Development Directors SIG session participants only.

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Administrative Services Section: Legal Issues Frequently Faced by Academic Pharmacy Administrators: Cases and Applications

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

This session will provide an overview of legal issues frequently faced by academic pharmacy administrators. An interactive law session with application-based cases will be delivered by content experts. Faculty currently or considering administrative positions are encouraged to attend. This session is designed to be appropriate for all disciplines and experience.

(Speaker) David D. Allen, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Joseph A. Dikun, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Diane B. Ginsburg, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Richard J. Kasmer, Northeast Ohio Medical University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Introduce and discuss current legal issues in higher education.
  2. Discuss nationwide research efforts profiling academic administrators perceptions, preparedness and professional development needs.
  3. Evaluate, discuss and assess legal issues facing higher education administrators in categories identified as important by previous research efforts.
  4. Formulate strategies for continued legal preparedness of academic administrators in schools of pharmacy.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-065-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Contemporary Approaches For Teaching Medicinal Chemistry

Jackson EF, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Chemistry Section; Biological Sciences Section; Pharmaceutics Section

As the profession of pharmacy has transitioned from a chemistry-centered profession to a patient-centered profession, the role of medicinal chemistry in the curriculum has evolved. There is decreased emphasis on memorization of chemical structures, and priority placed on relating these structures to ADME, physical properties, and pharmacodynamics. Simultaneously, the delivery of this content has shifted from traditional lecture format to other styles. Here we discuss some new approaches to teaching medicinal chemistry.

(Speaker) D. Eric Walters, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Stacy D. Brown, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Paul Trippier, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: Seeing the Forest and the Trees–A Focus on Individual Preceptor Development

Ryman Studio PQR, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Assessment Special Interest Group; Continuing Professional Development Section

The traditional approach to preceptor development is broad and focused on general principles that can be taught in a large group environment. Experiential Education leaders should also seek to develop preceptors individually. As mandated by Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016, Experiential Education faculty are charged with the formidable task of mentoring and guiding preceptors in their own development, and to this end, the session will discuss strategies to focus on the development of the individual preceptor.

(Speaker) Lindsay E. Davis, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Suzanne Larson, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Tracy K. Pettinger, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Alison M. Stevens, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the need for preceptor development on an individual and global level.
  2. Describe the utility of site visit forms to aid in an individual preceptor development plan.
  3. Explain how the Habits of Preceptors rubric could assist experiential education directors in the assessment and development of preceptors.
  4. Identify the benefits and obstacles of incorporating a teaching and learning curriculum into a program’s preceptor development strategy.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-067-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Experiential Education Section Presents:
Practical Approaches to Incorporate Interprofessional Education in Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences &
Practicing Self-Awareness With the Use of Academic Success Plans in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs)

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

Introductory/Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section

An overview of one school of pharmacy’s approach to incorporating and assessing pharmacy students’ exposure to interprofessional education (IPE) throughout Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE). With the release of the Entrustable Professional Activities, in addition to CAPE outcomes and accreditation standards, it is imperative that pharmacy educators determine approaches to expose students to IPE in early experiential rotations. Participants who may be interested in attending are: Experiential or IPE directors and faculty/preceptors interested in IPE.

CAPE Outcomes 2013 encourage schools of pharmacy to incorporate opportunities for students to practice self-awareness skills. In this session, two consortia schools describe how academic success plans (ASPs) were utilized in the APPE curricula to address subtle performance concerns documented in final preceptor evaluations. Data analysis substantiates the beneficial effect of ASPs on students’ future experiential performance, all while allowing students to engage in the construction of individualized improvement plans.

(Speaker) Ashley Crowl, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas

(Speaker) C. Lea Bonner, Mercer University; (Speaker) Lindsey H. Welch, The University of Georgia

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the process for incorporating ASPs into the APPE curriculum.
  2. Describe the benefits and challenges of using ASPs during APPEs.
  3. Discuss how ASPs can be used by students to meet CAPE Outcome 4 and encourage students to be active in their own personal success.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-062-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Challenges and Solutions in Library and Information Science

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Librarians, pharmacists, and scientists encounter diverse challenges relating to knowledge management, the creation, organization, and retrieval of information. This session will highlight current challenges faced in this area by colleagues from across the Academy. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in two roundtable discussions. By the end of the session, participants will be able to describe current challenges faced in Library and Information Science, and bring solutions back to their academic program.

(Moderator) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) Sandra Bai, Purdue University; (Speaker) Sally L. Haack, Drake University; (Speaker) Kristin Laughtin-Dunker, Chapman University; (Speaker) Scott Perkins, Campbell University; (Speaker) John L. Redwanski, University of New England; (Speaker) Priya Shenoy, Drake University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current challenges faced in Library and Information Science.
  2. Propose potential solutions to current challenges faced in Library and Information Science.
  3. Identify potential solutions that would be effective at your institution.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-068-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Techniques for Maximizing Learning: What Research in Educational Psychology Tells Us?

Lincoln A, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

As we face a new generation of students with different skill sets, we must reexamine how we teach and how we develop our curricula. This program will explore the ways in which we can maximize learning in our students.

(Moderator) C. Scott Asbill, Campbell University; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning SIG: Case Studies and Application of Emerging Technologies

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Educational technology continues to be an important component in pharmacy education. Panelists will discuss various forms of technology they have integrated into their courses/practice sites with emphasis on implementation and case study presentation. When appropriate, participants will be able to engage in the use of the technology within the session.

(Speaker) Timothy D. Aungst, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Anastasia L. Armbruster, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Andrew J. Crannage, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Erik D. Maki, Drake University; (Speaker) Marsha McFalls, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List various types of emerging technology.
  2. Discuss specific applications of technology in courses/practice sites.
  3. Discuss implementation of technology.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-081-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Combining Your Academic & Practice Efforts: Transforming Your Practice Site Into Your Classroom and Lab

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section

The goal of our programming is to help the attendee understand ways to utilize their practice to its fullest capacity to support their teaching, scholarly and creative efforts of their academic appointment. The format for each presentation will be a modified pechakucha, which entails a simple presentation whereby each speaker shows 20 images, each for 20 seconds and the images advance automatically while the speaker presents.

(Moderator) Paul Gubbins, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Chair) Michael W. Neville, Wingate University; (Speaker) Melanie A. Dodd, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Kathy Komperda, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Mollie A. Scott, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jennifer M. Trujillo, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Jamie L. Wagner, The University of Mississippi

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Understand and apply strategies to promote innovative practice/teaching efforts through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
  2. Describe strategies to translate the principles of the pharmacist care process into scholarly teaching.
  3. Recognize methods that efficiently transform faculty teaching efforts into successful revenue generating clinical practice in the ambulatory care setting.
  4. Recognize methods that efficiently generate scholarship from successfully developed, revenue generating faculty practice efforts.
  5. Identify effective methods to perform peer-assessment of all types of teaching efforts.
  6. Identify strategies that translate difficult peer-to-peer encounters into personal and professional development for student learners to address conflict resolution that arises in real-life practice.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-070-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Addressing Social and Administrative Sciences Priorities in Teaching, Research and Service: Roundtable

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Public Health Special Interest Group

Join facilitators from diverse pharmacy programs to discuss how they have addressed Social and Administrative Sciences (SAS) thematic priorities in their scholarship, teaching, and/or service. The SAS Section priorities include: assessing the impact of pharmacist services, interprofessional education, new pharmacy business models, pharmacy manpower, and science of safety.

(Moderator) Ana C. Quiñones-Boex, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Chair) John P. Bentley, The University of Mississippi

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG: Panel Discussion: Current and New Revenue Streams

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

This session is designed to engage participants on current and new revenue sources. Some of the topics will include: new tuition revenue and scholarship opportunities; enrollment management; and new academic programs.

(Chair) William J. Cooper, University of Maryland

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG: Rapid Fire/Business Items

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Administrative and Finance Officers Special Interest Group

Fee: $350 ($75 with a full conference registration). Pre-registration recommended; registration includes lunch and Sunday morning’s sessions.

Moderated group discussion of current hot topics and what information should be covered at future meetings. Learn who your operational peer institutions are; Moderated discussion that will focus on key operational areas to learn who you are most like. Key areas will be sent out in advance so you come prepared to participate. SIG Business Items and Interim Meeting topics.

(Chair) William J. Cooper, University of Maryland

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Administrative Services Section: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section

Annual Business Meeting for the Administrative Services Section.

(Chair) Jill A. Morgan, University of Maryland

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Award for Excellence in Assessment

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Recipients of the 2017 Award for Excellence in Assessment will present their award-winning submissions.

  • Neal Benedict, University of Pittsburgh, presenting Blended Simulation Progress Testing for Assessment of Practice Readiness
  • Adam M. Persky, Jacqueline E. Mclaughlin, Heidi Anksorus, Jessica M. Greene, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, presenting Developing an Innovative, Comprehensive First-1 Year Capstone to Assess and Improve Student Learning and Curriculum Effectiveness
  • Therese Poirier, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, presenting A Programmatic Model for Student and Faculty Assessment of Interprofessional Education Simulation Training

(Moderator) Rosalyn P. Vellurattil, University of Illinois at Chicago

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Business Meeting

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Intended Audience: Biological Sciences Section

A meeting of the section that will update members on activities of the past year and planned activities for the coming year. Committee reports will be presented and items relevant to the business of the section will be discussed and voted on, the latter pending attendance reaching quorum.

(Chair) Timothy J. Bloom, Campbell University; (Speaker) Daniel R. Kennedy, Western New England University; (Speaker) Fadi T. Khasawneh, University of Texas at El Paso

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Business Meeting

Jackson EF, Level M

Intended Audience: Chemistry Section

Annual Business Meeting for the Chemistry Section.

(Chair) Marc W. Harrold, Duquesne University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Continuing Professional Development Section: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio PQR, Level 0

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section

Annual Business Meeting for the CPD Section.

(Chair) Trina J. von Waldner, The University of Georgia

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Experiential Education Section: Business Meeting

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section

Annual business meeting for the Experiential Education Section.

(Chair) Wesley A. Nuffer, University of Colorado

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

Annual business meeting for the Library and Information Science Section.

(Chair) Skye Bickett, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Business Meeting

Lincoln A, Level M

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section

Pharmaceutics section business meeting to discuss projects for the next year as well as programming for webinars and annual meeting programming. We will also present a summary of the year's activities.

(Chair) Catherine A. White, The University of Georgia

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Business Meeting

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section

Annual business meeting for the Pharmacy Practice Section.

(Chair) Michael W. Neville, Wingate University; (Speaker) Debbie C. Byrd, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Kristi W. Kelley, Auburn University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Business Meeting

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section

This session will be used to conduct the business of the Social and Administrative Sciences Section. Updates on recent section activities and initiatives will be provided. Introductions of graduate students, Pharm.D. students, fellows, and residents in attendance will be made. Future directions of the section will be discussed. New section officers will be installed.

(Chair) John P. Bentley, The University of Mississippi

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Special Session: A ‘Rosetta Stone’ for Pharmacy Education—A Global Language and Shared Vision for Collaboration

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Public Health Special Interest Group

Pharmacy schools around the world are embarking on significant redesign and refinement of their curricula in part, to produce graduates who are more globally engaged and accountable. This goal means that faculty must communicate more effectively across borders, including understanding regional variations in pharmacy education terminology. To improve this translation, pharmacademy.org includes a new ‘Rosetta stone’ feature designed to match potential collaborators with common interests and to share curricular resources mapped by element.

(Speaker) Tina Brock, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Marcus Ferrone, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Jill M. Fitzgerald, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Lisa Holle, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Clark Kebodeaux, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) David R. Steeb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast terminologies for common curricular elements in pharmacy education.
  2. Contribute to a global resource for networking and sharing learning resources.
  3. Identify potential collaborators with common interests.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-076-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

New Investigator Award Poster Session

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1–B4, Level 0

Interested in learning about research funded by the AACP New Investigator Award? Join the 2015–2016 NIA recipients from 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. as they talk about their NIA experiences and present the results of their research.

4:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

Exhibitors’ Opening Reception and Research/Education Poster Session 1

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1–B4, Level 0

Name Badge Required

Hungry for information on the latest products and services to support your work? Have a thirst for new knowledge about research and education? Join the exhibitors for hors d'oeuvres and refreshments, and they’ll fill you in on new tools. From 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m., chat with peers about their posters.

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Past President's Dinner

Off-site: Husk Nashville

By Invitation Only

AACP past presidents dinner hosted by Immediate Past President Cynthia Boyle of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Past presidents attending should plan to meet at 5:30 p.m. for a group photo. Immediately following the photo, the group will depart.

7:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties & Department Chairs Welcome the AACP Walmart Scholars

Tennessee Ballroom A, Level 2

By Invitation Only

7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

PharmAcademic Client Reception, hosted by McCreadie Group

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

By Invitation Only

We are excited to host a reception for our School/College of Pharmacy PharmAcademic clients to share ideas and network with fellow industry colleagues.

Back to Top

Monday, July 17

Educational Day Sponsor:
NACDS Logo

6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.

Circuit Training

Tennessee Ballroom A, Level 2

Join your colleagues in a 45-minute high energy circuit workout that uses a variety of formats to keep you motivated while improving your overall fitness. This aerobic workout puts the emphasis as much on having fun as breaking a sweat. All are welcome. Appropriate for all fitness levels.

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2; Ryman Ballroom Foyer, Level 0

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Special Interest Group (SIG) Cabinet Meeting

Jackson AB, Level M

The chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs will meet to discuss the business of the AACP Special Interest Groups.

(Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, AACP

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 2

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Edward M. DeSimone II, Creighton University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Lead-Grow-Shape-Faculty Breakfast, hosted by the Pharmacy Leadership & Education Institute (PLEI)

Cascades

A session for faculty interested in training student pharmacists in leadership, self-awareness, professionalism, and entrepreneurship. Hear insights from 2016–2017 faculty and get answers to questions from additional faculty interested in using the Lead-Grow-Shape curriculum in subsequent years.

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Accelerated Pharmacy Program Consortium

Presidential Mezzanine Level, Presidential Boardroom A

Attendees will engage in a focused forum emphasizing the opportunities and challenges common amongst all accelerated pharmacy programs and develop meaningful connections, possibly culminating in positive institutional change through shared projects and resources.

(Speaker) David G. Fuentes, Pacific University Oregon;(Speaker) Jeremy A. Hughes, Pacific University Oregon;(Speaker) Catherine L. Oswald, Roseman University of Health Sciences

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

Please check-in for Pharmacy Education 2017 and pick-up your name badge here. We are also available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app, and help you get started with AACP Connect. Discover the new online, private community exclusively for members to communicate and collaborate with each other in a virtual home. Learn how to create your profile, post to a discussion board, upload documents, and much more using AACP Connect.

7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Networking Rooms 1, 2 and 3

Presidential Boardroom A, Level M; Ryman Studios D and E, Level 0

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the Registration and Help Desk.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Elevating Evidence-Based Medicine Skills Through a Sequence of Practical Activities in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Ryman Studio PQR, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Library and Information Science Section

To be practice-ready, student pharmacists must make clinical decisions with ambiguous and incomplete evidence. This three-part evidence-based medicine (EBM) assignment sequence in ambulatory care and community pharmacy advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) focuses on a controversial case and promotes communication skills while reflecting authentic pharmacist tasks. Participants will explore this educational strategy and discuss how to implement it into their experiential curriculum. This session is targeted at faculty involved with experiential education and EBM curriculum.

(Moderator) Caitlin Frail, University of Minnesota; (Moderator) Ann M. Philbrick, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Jean Y. Moon, University of Minnesota

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Integrating Health Literacy and Cross-Cultural Communication Within the Pharmacy Curricula: Sharing Challenges and Best Practices

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Public Health Special Interest Group

Health literacy (HL) is a vital component of culture and communication. The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) and Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcome statements require pharmacy students to address HL and modify communication strategies to meet patient needs. This session will examine the existing challenges to teaching this topic in the curricula, including the lack of pharmacy-specific resources. Facilitators will illustrate their best practices to resolve these challenges using self-made videos and in-class group activities to teach HL within the setting of cross-cultural issues.

(Speaker) Sally Arif, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Christina Mnatzaganian, University of California San Diego

At the completion of this activity, participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the need for and challenges of delivering health literacy and cross-cultural communication training within pharmacy curricula.
  2. Review methods and best practices learned from health literacy and cross-cultural communication modules.
  3. Assess videos demonstrating health literacy problems and cross-cultural communication barriers in various pharmacy settings.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-056-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Lessons from the Ground on Active Learning

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Biological Sciences Section; Chemistry Section; Pharmaceutics Section

Educational reform emphasizes application of knowledge and skills in the classroom. Thus, the focus of pharmacy education shifts towards maximizing the quality of student-instructor contact time. In this session, we will discuss active learning from ground level including do’s, don’t tips and pitfalls. Every course can benefit from highly structured active learning. The success will come with planning, reflection, a little patience, and by knowing the evidence for “why” you are making the course changes.

(Moderator) Daniel R. Kennedy, Western New England University; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify at least three “lessons learned” (key concepts) that can inform your teaching practice.
  2. Identify at least three specific teaching strategies, techniques or tools that you can adopt and apply.
  3. Commit to adapt and apply at least one “lesson learned” and one new strategy.
  4. Identify at least two useful resources and references for follow-up.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-064-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Curriculum SIG: Advances in Developing the Affective Domain: Key Highlights of Innovative Approaches

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

This session will enable participants to explore innovative methods for developing the affective domains described in Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards 2016 (specifically Standards 3 and 4). This program will showcase successful examples of developing, implementing and assessing innovative methods. Innovations will include curricular (didactic or experiential) and/or co-curricular examples. Participants will join a series of presenter-facilitated roundtable sessions covering innovative approaches such as: TED Talks, Twitter and Threads and new looks at Portfolios and longitudinal courses.

(Moderator) Eunice P. Chung, Western University of Health Sciences; (Moderator) Jennifer A. Henriksen, Manchester University; (Speaker) Neal J. Benedict, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Laurie L. Briceland, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Shane Desselle, Touro University California; (Speaker) Eric H. Gilliam, University of Colorado; (Speaker) Nancy A. Mason, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Whitney Maxwell, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Jane R. Mort, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Therese I. Poirier, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Adam C. Welch, East Tennessee State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe how schools of pharmacy have developed and implemented innovative affective domain activities in the didactic and experiential curriculum, as well as the co-curriculum.
  2. Identify methods to assess the affective domain.
  3. Share lessons learned in the development of these innovative practices.
  4. Discuss strategies on how to incorporate these activities into your institution’s pharmacy curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-058-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Health Care Ethics SIG: Ethical Dilemmas in Pharmacotherapy – Communication and Conflict Resolution Skills for the Pharmacy Learner Continuum

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Transition of the profession into provider status is expected to involve pharmacists in more frequent and more complex ethical dilemmas. These dilemmas and resulting conflict may obstruct clinical care objectives. Stakeholders in these dilemmas include patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, employers, reimbursement, and societal institutions. During this session, pharmacy educators will be provided with skills and communication practices in conflict management and resolution, with particular focus on ethical dilemmas in patient care.

(Speaker) James Ruble, The University of Utah; (Moderator) Robert M. Cisneros, Campbell University; (Moderator) Krystal Moorman, The University of Utah

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe sources of conflict and the continuum involving disputes, conflicts and the conflict spiral.
  2. Compare three styles for managing conflict.
  3. Evaluate three examples of conflict involving ethical dilemmas.
  4. Develop a plan for responding to ethical conflict in a pharmacy practice setting.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-059-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: How to Develop Critical Thinking Skills in Pharmacy Students

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section

As we enter a new phase in pharmacy education and are teaching a new generation of student that has different skill sets than previous generations, we are noticing that some of our students are deficient in critical thinking skills. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate through lecture, discussion and active learning how critical thinking skills can be taught and developed in our students.

(Moderator) C. Scott Asbill, Campbell University; (Speaker) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Assessment of Co-Curriculum Outcomes & Student's Professional Development

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

The main purpose of co-curricular experiences is to advance students’ professional development. These activities should be designed, implemented, and assessed to better meet the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) accreditation standards. This program will highlight to participants quantitative and qualitative outcomes based on evaluation of various national pharmacy program. In addition, the program will describe effective strategies for developing, implementing, and assessing successful co-curriculum programs nationwide.

(Speaker) Abby A. Kahaleh, Roosevelt University; (Speaker) J. Gregory Boyer, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Linda S. Garavalia, Western University of Health Sciences

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe recent ACPE quantitative and qualitative data on co-curriculum plans.
  2. Share effective strategies for mapping co-curricular experiences to the ACPE Standards.
  3. Describe successful examples for designing, implementing and assessing co-curricular experiences for national and international students.
  4. Share “lessons learned” from well-established pharmacy programs.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-037-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Reports of the 2016–2017 Standing Committees

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees: Academic Affairs, Advocacy, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, Student Affairs, and the Special Task Force on Diversifying our Investment in Human Capital. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members.

(Chair) Renae J. Chesnut, Drake University; (Chair) Brian L. Crabtree, Wayne State University; (Chair) Ronald P. Jordan, Chapman University; (Chair) Amy L. Pittenger, University of Minnesota; (Chair) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Chair) Karen Whalen, University of Florida; (Chair) Carla Y. White, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Global Pharmacy Education SIG: Don’t Forget the Wrap-up! Promoting Strategies for Positive and Meaningful Closure of Global Health Student Experiences

Jackson EF, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Global Pharmacy Education Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Public Health Special Interest Group

As more student pharmacists participate in global health experiences it is important to not only prepare them for their time abroad but also to provide closure on these often life-changing experiences. This session will bring together faculty from three different programs to discuss techniques to wrap up student experiences. Presenters will address reverse-culture shock, multiple strategies for reflection, assessment of global health competencies, and methods for students to discuss their experiences during an interview.

(Moderator) Toyin S. Tofade, Howard University; (Speaker) Tina Brock, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Sharon E. Connor, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Lauren J. Jonkman, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Monica L. Miller, Purdue University; (Speaker) Ellen M. Schellhase, Purdue University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Articulate the challenges students encounter when returning to the U.S. after their time abroad.
  2. Identify and develop strategies for closure that can be utilized within global experiences at your institution
  3. Compare and contrast the techniques used to wrap up a global experience.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-061-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Presidential Chamber B, Level 2

Sponsored by Liaison International
Liaison Logo

Make time to stop by the complimentary R&R Lounge to unwind, check your e-mail and charge your phone, tablet or laptop. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment.

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Development of an Elective Course on the Medical Use of Cannabis

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation regarding the use of cannabis for defined medical purposes including four states which mandate by law, only pharmacists can dispense cannabis for medical uses. As such, pharmacists are becoming increasingly essential in identifying drug interactions, answering questions regarding administration and pharmacokinetic parameters, and in some states, directly involved with dispensing. The medical cannabis elective developed at MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester is the first course to our knowledge specifically designed for healthcare practitioners to present a curriculum covering the biochemistry, pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and therapeutics, based on the scientific and clinical evidence surrounding use of cannabis as a medical drug.

(Speaker) Evan R. Horton, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester; (Speaker) Matthew Metcalf, MCPHS University–Worcester/Manchester

9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Research/Education Poster Session 2

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1-B4, Level 0

Name Badge Required

Poster presenters will be at their posters from 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouses/Guests Hospitality Room

Washington A, Level M

9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Exhibition Hall Open

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1–B4, Level 0

9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) Foundation Information Desk

Presidential Lobby, Level 2

9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

AACP Headshot Café

Tennessee Lobby A, Level 2

Sponsored by Rite Aid
Rite Aid Logo

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2; Ryman Ballroom Foyer, Level 0

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence SIG: Implementing Diversity Into Patient Cases

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This session will provide an overview of how to create patient cases which incorporate cultural, socioeconomic and health literacy elements into a case.

(Moderator) Naser Z. Alsharif, Creighton University; (Speaker) Yolanda M. Hardy, Chicago State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify key elements in practice case writing.
  2. Explain the benefits of incorporating items related to culture and health disparities into practice patient cases.
  3. Explain how integrating cultural competency and health disparities into practice patient cases can address CAPE Outcome 3.5.
  4. Create a practice patient case that fully integrates elements related to culture and health disparities.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-105-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Science Plenary: Science = Solutions: The Opioid Crisis in the USA

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group;

Pharmacy Practice Section

Join Dr. Wilson M. Compton, deputy director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health, as he describes how the misuse of and addiction to opioids is a serious national problem that affects public health, as well as social and economic welfare. At NIDA, Dr. Compton provides scientific leadership in the development, implementation and management of NIDA’s research portfolio and works with the director to support and conduct research to improve the prevention and treatment of drug abuse and addiction.

At the Science Plenary he’ll address the opioid crisis in the United States, the rising incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (due to opioid use during pregnancy), and the increased spread of infectious diseases, including HIV and hepatitis C. Primary approaches to addressing the crisis include prevention, addressing the underlying addiction issues, and treating overdoses directly by increasing access to naloxone. Longer-term research includes the development of pain medications with reduced abuse/addiction potential. In addition, the ways that pharmacists can play central roles in changing prescribing practices, increasing access to naloxone, and improving access to methadone and buprenorphine with pharmacy dispensing will be reviewed.

AACP President-elect Steve Scott will present the Association’s top research awards, the Paul R. Dawson Award and the Volwiler Research Achievement Award.

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the current opioid crisis in the United States.
  2. List primary approaches to resolving the crisis.
  3. Discuss long-term research approaches to resolving the crisis.
  4. Identify ways that pharmacists can be central to changing prescribing practices and increasing access to naloxone, methadone and buprenorphine.

(Moderator) Steven A. Scott, Purdue University; (Speaker) Wilson M. Compton, National Institute on Drug Abuse

TBD

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-031-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Special Session: Death Over Dinner—Beginning the Conversation About the End of Life

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group; Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group; Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

Let’s have dinner and talk about death: This interprofessional workshop raises awareness about end-of-life issues and how to initiate conversations with students, patients, colleagues and families. Video clips, a paper-based questionnaire, and small and large group discussions will dig into end-of-life care issues. The goal is to provide resources and shared experiences that can be replicated with students on campuses, patients in healthcare settings, and families gathered around dining room tables. Intended audience is interprofessional faculty.

(Speaker) Brenda S. Bray, Washington State University; (Speaker) Barbara Richardson, Washington State University; (Speaker) Megan Willson, Washington State University; (Speaker) Lisa J. Woodard, Washington State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss resources available for guiding end-of-life discussions.
  2. Discuss ways in which the "Death over Dinner" workshop prepares participants to talk about end-of-life issues.
  3. Implement an interprofessional "Death over Dinner" workshop.
  4. Discuss ways in which this activity addresses IPEC core competencies and CAPE outcomes.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-042-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Administrative Services Section: Interim Appointments: Storm Warnings—Are You Prepared?

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Administrative Services Section; Pharmacy Practice Section

Interim and acting appointments for dean and other administrative positions are commonplace in contemporary pharmacy education. Based on the recent AJPE article “The Influence of Interim Deans: More than Keeping the Ship Afloat and Warming the Captain’s Seat,” we will describe opportunities, challenges, strategies and recommendations for schools and individuals considering or navigating these appointments. In frank reflections on academic administration, we will share insights and experiences to help participants chart a course to the future.

(Moderator) Brian L. Crabtree, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Cynthia J. Boyle, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Renae J. Chesnut, Drake University; (Speaker) David P. Zgarrick, Northeastern University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe three environmental factors which affect a school’s operational and strategic plans during an interim appointment of a dean or other school leader.
  2. Discuss six leadership styles for individuals considering or appointed to an interim position.
  3. Identify two internal and two external opportunities for individuals and schools/colleges to capitalize on an interim appointment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-43-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Boxed Lunch in the Exhibit Hall and Research/Education Poster Session 3

Ryman Exhibit Hall B1–B4, Level 0

Ticket and Name Badge Required

Grab a boxed lunch in the exhibit hall and take a look at more displays including the winners of the Innovations in Teaching Competition and Excellence in Assessment Award. From Noon–1:00 p.m., you can also meet with poster presenters.

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

All Members of the Council of Deans are invited to receive reports on current and future council priorities.

(Chair) Natalie D. Eddington, University of Maryland

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Business Meeting

Presidential Ballroom CE, Level 2

Annual Business Meeting for the Council of Faculties.

(Chair) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Leadership Development SIG: Meaningful and Manageable Strategies for Assessing Student Leadership Development Across the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Identifying strategies for assessing student leadership development (SLD) remains difficult. This session, developed for faculty involved with teaching SLD or responsible for curricular assessment and design, will feature a brief overview of the current SLD landscape in Pharm.D. curricula, followed by case studies from faculty currently engaged in SLD assessment. Each case study will introduce relevant context, details regarding the assessment strategy, required preparatory work, costs and other logistics, outcomes observed, and lessons learned.

(Moderator) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Moderator) Michelle L. Hilaire, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Bill Bowman, Midwestern University-Glendale; (Speaker) Kerry K. Fierke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Michael Fulford, University of Georgia; (Speaker) Kristin Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Linda Logan, University of Georgia; (Speaker) Todd Sorensen, University of Minnesota;

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Wait…This Test Isn't Online!?

Washington B, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Assessment Special Interest Group;

Curriculum Special Interest Group

The session will describe assessment modalities beyond traditional knowledge-based exams used in therapeutics courses at three schools of pharmacy. Assessments discussed will cover individual and group examinations from both TBL and PBL classes. Emphasis is placed on successes and challenges for administering complex assessments to large classes. The speakers will engage with the audience to explore a variety of alternative assessments and share ideas that participants can integrate into their respective curricula.

(Moderator) Kristen L. Helms, Auburn University; (Speaker) Brian L. Crabtree, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Nathan A. Pinner, Auburn University; (Speaker) Daniel M. Riche, The University of Mississippi

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Cross-Institutional Quality Improvement: Road Mapping the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process Within Skills Laboratory Curricula

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

The session provides participants with a tangible method for road map development to evaluate and demonstrate how the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process is designed, delivered, and monitored within a skills laboratory or simulation curriculum, consistent with Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Accreditation Standards. During the session participants will also be introduced to a quality improvement process that facilitates constructive feedback between four schools/colleges of pharmacy regarding Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process road maps. Target audience is laboratory and experiential coordinators/instructors.

(Speaker) Sheila M. Allen, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Casey Gallimore, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Anita Siu, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; (Speaker) Jamie L. Woodyard, Purdue University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe a road mapping framework that can be applied to evaluate and demonstrate how the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process is designed, delivered, and monitored within a skills laboratory or simulation curriculum.
  2. Critically review a road map to provide constructive feedback on the strengths and opportunities for improvement in how a curriculum prepares students to provide care consistent with the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.
  3. Identify a novel learning activity/sequence or assessment that has been (or could be) implemented in your own skills laboratory or simulation curriculum to strengthen training on the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-038-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Diversity: Celebrated or Integrated?

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Minority Faculty Special Interest Group; Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

It isn’t always easy, knowing what to say (or not to say) about race and ethnicity. Do we just merely talk about “diversity”, or is it actually being integrated into all pharmacy programs? Pertinent short films and group discussion will explore these questions, offer food for thought and invite a collegial dialogue between faculty, staff and students. Participants will receive resources to help them implement culturally competent individual goals constructed during this session.

(Moderator) Hope Campbell, Belmont University; (Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Edgar Diaz-Cruz, Belmont University; (Speaker) Angela M. Hagan, Belmont University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between cultural competency, cultural sensitivity and cultural proficiency.
  2. Critically analyze cultural perspectives they have regarding certain students, faculty and staff at their institution.
  3. Compare and contrast their cross-cultural experiences with panel members and the larger audience.
  4. Create personal goals to implement culturally competent strategies that promote inclusivity in teaching.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-072-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Do Your Rubrics Measure Up? Assessing and Enhancing the Reliability of Rubrics in APPE

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section

Appendix 2 of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) 2016 Standards emphasizes the importance of reliable, validated assessments for APPE competencies. This session will provide participants with tools to measure reliability of rubrics used during APPEs. Reliability testing will be reviewed and reliability statistics of a rubric for assessment of SOAP notes in APPE will be shared as an example. A workshop portion will give the participants an opportunity to gain experience measuring and interpreting reliability statistics. While this session will focus on reliability assessment for APPE, the methods used to establish reliability would be applicable to rubrics for IPPE and non-experiential assessment as well.

(Speaker) Miranda R. Andrus, Auburn University; (Speaker) Dana G. Carroll, Auburn University; (Speaker) Kristi W. Kelley, Auburn University; (Speaker) Sharon McDonough, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Pamela L. Stamm, Auburn University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of establishing reliability for rubrics used in APPE.
  2. Review the types of reliability and apply them to a rubric.
  3. Develop skills in conducting reliability testing of a rubric and interpreting results.
  4. Develop a plan for reliability testing of a rubric used in APPE.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-039-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Integrating Managed Care Principles Into Pharmacy Curricula—A Critical Need in Today’s Healthcare Environment

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Continuing Professional Development Section

What is and what should be taught in Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)-accredited schools of pharmacy as it relates to managed care? This session will highlight findings from the literature and a recent survey administered by AMCP on the inclusion of managed care topics within school of pharmacy curricula. Attendees will explore available resources that can strengthen managed care pharmacy curricular offerings. This session will also share case studies from faculty on teaching managed care from several divergent programs.

(Speaker) Steven Kheloussi, Wilkes University; (Speaker) Jeff Lee, Lipscomb University; (Speaker) Robert Navarro, University of Florida

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the current landscape relative to curriculum offerings in managed care principles within schools of pharmacy in the United States and how this relates to the ACPE standards.
  2. Contrast current approaches to integrating managed care principles into pharmacy curricula at three schools of pharmacy.
  3. Develop a repository of resources for building a managed care course(s) at your school of pharmacy.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-040-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2; Ryman Ballroom Foyer, Level 0

3:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Highlighting #RxInnovation: Postcards to Your Legislators

Tennessee Registration Desk, Level 2

Feeling frustrated about the dwindling appreciation for research and STEM education on Capitol Hill? Want to make your voice heard but don’t know where to start? Now you can join the conversation on the pivotal role that research at colleges and schools of pharmacy plays in moving the health research enterprise forward. AACP staff will be on hand to help you craft your message, and you’ll be able to write a postcard to your legislator that shares your story of pharmacy research impacting lives for the better.

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Assessing Team Work in Pharmacy Education Using a Secure, Web-Based Platform: The CATME System

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

This session will provide an overview on the use of a secure, online team management and assessment system that will enhance an instructor's ability to manage teams and assess individual and team function. The system facilitates communication with faculty members and between students within a team. The session will allow hands-on learning that can be applied to didactic, experiential and interprofessional settings. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop or tablet.

(Speaker) Kimberly A. Ference, Wilkes University; (Speaker) Edward F. Foote, Wilkes University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of effectively managing, assessing and improving teamwork among learners.
  2. Employ an online peer evaluation system in the classroom or experiential setting.
  3. Interpret peer feedback.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-045-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Mini Session: “POPSICL—An Innovative Active Learning Model for Laboratory Course”

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

This session will present an innovative active learning model in a laboratory setting for achieving CAPE outcomes in problem solving, innovation, self-assessment, leadership and teamwork. The session will focus on the implementation of a Patient Oriented, Problem Solving, Inquiry, Co-operative Learning (POPSICL) model in pharmaceutics laboratory course. A step-by-step process of POPSICL that integrates multiple teaching pedagogies will be presented. Lessons learned will be useful to apply this model to pharmaceutics or other laboratory courses.

(Moderator) Omathanu Perumal, South Dakota State University; (Speaker) Hemachand Tummala, South Dakota State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Provide an overview of POPSICL model.
  2. Describe step-by-step implementation of the POPSICL model.
  3. Discuss the assessment strategies to determine the student learning outcomes of POPSICL.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-046-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Yoga Fitness Session

Tennessee Ballroom A, Level 2

Fitness enthusiasts are welcome to enjoy a yoga class that allows all fitness levels to participate. Yoga mats will be available on a first-come, first-served basis; however, the class will be held in a carpeted room so mats are not required.

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Special Session: Integration of Pharmacy in Population Health Initiatives—Are We There Yet?

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group

This session will explore the concept of population health, its definition and concepts. It will provide an overview of the opportunities and challenges in population health and the pharmacists’ roles in transforming care delivery, team care and active engagement in research/scholarly opportunities. We will explore these opportunities from the perspectives of experts on population health and healthcare systems leaders from various professions and backgrounds. There will be active participation from the audience in formulating solutions and opportunities for the profession and the Academy in the area of population health.

(Moderator) Steven W. Chen, University of Southern California; (Moderator) Courtney V. Fletcher, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Moderator) Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, University of Maryland; (Moderator) Leigh Ann Ross, The University of Mississippi; (Moderator) Marie A. Smith, University of Connecticut; (Moderator) Kevin B. Sneed, University of South Florida; (Moderator) Lynda S. Welage, The University of New Mexico

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the term “population health” and its implication in healthcare.
  2. List three major challenges and opportunities for pharmacy in population health initiatives.
  3. Define the role of population health in pharmacy education, practice and research.
  4. Identify strategies for the integration of pharmacy in population health initiatives.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-104-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Practicing Patient Care Documentation is BORING: Course and Curricular Level Innovations That Move Beyond the “Practice Makes Perfect” Approach

Ryman Studio PQR, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Patient care documentation is a vital part of patient care. Often instruction revolves around the “practice makes perfect” model, with students writing numerous SOAP notes. This approach is resource intensive and can create disengagement as students argue grading differences. This session will focus on instructional options beyond repeated note writing. Faculty from two schools will share innovations that include critiquing notes with intentional structural errors, and the use of a strategic note quality calibration process.

(Speaker) Michael C. Brown, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Kassandra M. Bartelme, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Anne M. Schullo-Feulner, University of Minnesota

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe evidence-informed options for varying the teaching of patient care documentation.
  2. Discuss options for threading clinical documentation skills in the curriculum.
  3. Select 1–2 promising patient care documentation teaching options that are likely to have a strong impact in your area of teaching.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-119-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Patient Care Process—Unique Tools to Implement

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

This session will provide tools for the implementation of the Patient Care Process in self-care teaching. A major goal in the Joint Commission of Pharmacy Practitioners (JCPP) strategic plan is the implementation and promotion of a scalable, viable and consistent pharmacists’ patient care process. Our goal for this session is to have attendees have the ability to expand on and implement the ideas they have learned into their own classrooms/experiences.

(Speaker) Holly S. Divine, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Stefanie P. Ferreri, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Misty M. Stutz, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Kathryn J. Smith, University of Florida

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the JCPP Pharmacists' Patient Care Process and its role in self-care.
  2. Identify ways to incorporate the Patient Care Process into rubrics currently used at your institution.
  3. Review the use of student triads in a self-care course to practice collecting patient information, assessing a self-care scenario and making a therapeutic plan.
  4. Explain how to utilize documentation forms to incorporate Patient Care Process into the self-care classroom and experiential setting with a focus on the implementation and follow-up components of the process.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-047-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: A Tool for Preceptors: Help Your APPE Students Identify and Achieve Individualized Learning Goals

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

This interactive session includes strategies to individualize learning outcomes during APPEs. Attendees will use an Intention/Reflection (I/R) practice to help students identify specific learning goals, help customize rotations to meet students’ interests, and meet CAPE Outcomes/Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards. Faculty members from private and public institutions conducting rotations of varying lengths will share data describing significant improvement in outcomes such as self-awareness and metacognition in students on rotation(s). Participants will also develop a customized I/R practice.

(Speaker) Keri D. Hager, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Kerry K. Fierke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Gardner A. Lepp, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Whitney Maxwell, University of South Carolina; (Speaker) Brandon J. Sucher, Regis University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define Intention/Reflection practice.
  2. Describe the benefits of incorporating the I/R practice into educational activities.
  3. Apply evidence-based questions into the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) to connect students to curricular initiatives on rotations and develop personally and professionally.
  4. Identify the CAPE Outcomes/ACPE Standards achieved in APPEs by implementing I/R practice initiatives.
  5. Utilize experiences from colleagues and evidence-based concepts for best practice in promoting I/R in APPE rotations.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-050-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Flipping Pharmacy: A Course Example of How Washington State University is Altering Distance Education

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmaceutics Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

Washington State University College of Pharmacy has implemented a flipped classroom model across its curriculum to provide a unique approach to multi-campus distance education. This session will offer 1) an overview of models used for distance education; 2) a summary of the flipped curriculum approach utilized by WSUCOP; and 3) immersion into a sample flipped classroom experience in a WSUCOP pharmaceutics course. The target audience is new and experienced faculty.

(Speaker) Damianne Brand-Eubanks, Washington State University; (Speaker) Connie M. Remsberg, Washington State University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods utilized in providing distance education.
  2. Discuss strategies for implementing a flipped classroom model as an approach for distance education.
  3. Describe the impact of a flipped classroom model on students and faculty.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-048-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Mapping Matters: Practical Lessons Learned Using Curriculum Mapping for Program Assessment, Improvement and Accreditation

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

In 2015, both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy and The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy implemented new Doctor of Pharmacy curricula. Session participants will learn why and how both programs engage faculty in and employ curriculum mapping to assess and ensure curricular effectiveness, inform continuous improvement, and meet external accreditation requirements. Participants will gain practical strategies, useful guidelines, technological tools, and valuable resources to adapt and apply curriculum mapping to their own programs.

(Moderator) Thomas A. Angelo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Wendy C. Cox, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Michelle A. Fravel, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Mary E. Ray, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Jacqueline M. Zeeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Student Services Personnel SIG: Innovative Approaches to Early Intervention, Advising and Student Success Programming

Presidential Ballroom CE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

The 2016 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards emphasize student progression, success and holistic development. While efforts aimed at student success have been implemented around the country at colleges of pharmacy, completion rates are still problematic and maintenance of health and wellbeing of pharmacy students remains challenging. This session will share how to best support student learning and success through early intervention strategies, new approaches to student advising and partnerships with campus resources.

(Speaker) Renee M. DeHart, Samford University; (Speaker) Susan M. Gardner, University of Charleston; (Speaker) Kim M. Jones, Union University; (Speaker) Heather M.W. Petrelli, University of South Florida

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explore and identify advising strategies and programs that support student progression, academic success and co-curricular learning.
  2. Examine and understand the importance of early intervention programs/strategies in regard to academic and holistic development and success of pharmacy students.
  3. Share and discuss mechanisms/strategies for identifying at-risk students and developing support services needed for student progression and success.
  4. Understand the importance of faculty-student interaction and relationships in student progression and success.
  5. Review, analyze and discuss student case studies and identify the best course of action/response needed to ensure progression and optimize student success.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-051-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG: Integrating Opioid Safety and Overdose Prevention Across the Curriculum

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group;

Public Health Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Attendees will acquire successful tools to integrate meaningful education covering opioid overdose epidemiology, definitions, counseling, risk factors and use of naloxone reversal into didactic, experiential, co-curricular, interprofessional and/or post-graduate education. Faculty will share their experience including techniques to utilize administrative resources and gain permission to incorporate into the curriculum, and analysis of student and faculty evaluations. Participants at each table will share their barriers with the panel and work together to address them.

(Moderator) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University; (Chair) Jeffrey P. Bratberg, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker) Patricia R. Freeman, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) James N. Barnes, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Lucas G. Hill, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Min Kwon, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Sarah T. Melton, East Tennessee State University; (Speaker) Ashley E. Moody, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Emma Palmer, Sullivan University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Evaluate techniques to contemporize curriculum on substance use disorder to include emphasis on opioid overdose response, opioid safety and effective community engagement.
  2. Compare and contrast different opioid safety educational methods, collaborations, and data evaluating each.
  3. Develop a framework to incorporate opioid safety and overdose risk screening, recognition, prevention, and communication into various facets of the curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-052-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Women Faculty SIG: The Impact of Unconscious Bias on Our Work as Educators, Clinicians and Administrators

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Administrative Services Section; Experiential Education Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

AACP has made part of their strategic plan initiatives to increase diversity in the Academy and the profession. This session will provide an opportunity to begin the dialogue of unconscious bias and its impact on the decisions and policies which guide our work. Participants will review the science of unconscious bias, discuss strategies on assessing unconscious bias and share strategies used at their institutions to address this topic.

(Speaker) Paula K. Davis, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Carla Y. White, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Sharon L. Youmans, University of California, San Francisco

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Review the science of unconscious bias.
  2. Examine strategies to assess unconscious bias on an individual and institutional level.
  3. Discuss strategies to address unconscious bias on an institutional, individual and policy level.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-106-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: 2020 and Beyond: A Discussion of Technology Trends Facing Academic and Research Libraries

Jackson EF, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group

New Media Consortium looks to higher education for collaboration with advancing innovation in learning-focused organizations. The NMC Horizon Report is an ongoing research project designed to identify and analyze emerging technologies likely to have impact on learning, teaching, and inquiry in education. This mini-session outlines results of the current reports with focus on higher education and libraries. Active learning discussion will exchange ideas for embracing change and preparing for local application.

(Speaker) Vern Duba, The University of Iowa

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Developing Entrustable Professional Activities for a New Curriculum

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

Participants will learn about creating entrustable professional activities (EPAs) to guide the development of an innovative, forward-looking curriculum at one new school of pharmacy. Our process of developing EPAs, mapping them to the curriculum, and creating assessment methods will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to begin to create EPAs for their own program and are encouraged to bring their program’s curriculum to the session for use in this activity.

(Moderator) Michael DeBisschop, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Stefanie A. George, Medical College of Wisconsin; (Speaker) Kajua B. Lor, Medical College of Wisconsin

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Leveling the Playing Field: A 3-Week Pharmacy Bridging Course for Incoming Students

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Bridging courses are short intensive courses commonly designed to increase knowledge, boost confidence, facilitate academic transitions, and enhance student preparation for more advanced impending coursework. In fall 2015, a three-week pharmacy bridging course covering five modular foundational math and science areas (applied math, biochemistry, biostatistics, organic chemistry, physiology) was implemented as a required course for entering first-year pharmacy students. The session will describe the justification, design, outcomes and lessons learned from the course.

(Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Scott F. Singleton, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Global Pharmacy Education SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

The Global Pharmacy Education SIG will discuss business-related needs, including review, prioritization implementation of the Strategic Plan and review of the SIG’s bylaws. The SIG will also provide updates on its three white papers. Installation of new SIG officers will take place.

(Chair) Shaun E. Gleason, University of Colorado

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Health Care Ethics SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group

This meeting will review Health Care SIG activities over the last year, plan for the coming year and conduct any other business of the SIG. We hope you will attend this SIG meeting and help us move our SIG forward!

(Speaker) James Ruble, The University of Utah

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Health Disparities and Cultural Competence SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group

This business meeting will discuss important orders of business for the SIG and include introduction of new officers. Members will be able to sign up for committees during the meeting.

(Chair) Anastasia L. Armbruster, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Naser Z. Alsharif, Creighton University; (Speaker) Lakesha M. Butler, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Sally L. Haack, Drake University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio MNO, Level 0

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group

This session will serve as the annual business meeting and networking session for the Laboratory Instructors SIG.

(Chair) Krista L. Donohoe, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Amy Ives, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Karen R. Sando, University of Florida

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Library and Information Science Section: Professional Resources Committee Meeting

Jackson EF, Level M

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section

This is the business meeting for the Professional Resources Committee of the Library and Information Science section. This committee is responsible for the AACP Basic Resources for Pharmacy Education and Core List of Journals for Pharmacy Education.

(Speaker) Sharon Giovenale, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Pediatric Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio PQR, Level 0

Intended Audience: Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

This program is the annual business meeting and networking session for the Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group. New officers will be introduced and members will be able to sign up for committees during the meeting.

(Chair) Timothy J. Todd, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Mary A. Worthington, Samford University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Public Health SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio HI, Level 0

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group

Annual Business Meeting for the Public Health SIG.

(Chair) David A. Gettman, D'Youville College; (Speaker) Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University; (Speaker) Suzanne Clark, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Business Meeting

Washington B, Level M

Intended Audience: Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group

Annual Business Meeting for the Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG.

(Chair) Amanda M. Howard-Thompson, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Emily M. Ambizas, St. John's University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Student Services Personnel SIG: Business Meeting

Presidential Ballroom CE, Level 2

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group

Annual Business Meeting for the Student Services Personnel SIG.

(Chair) Susan M. Gardner, University of Charleston; (Speaker) Renee M. DeHart, Samford University; (Speaker) Jennifer S. Williams, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Heather MW Petrelli, University of South Florida

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Intended Audience: Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Special Interest Group

Annual business meeting held to update SIG members on upcoming activities, election of chair-elect, and planning for programming for the next year.

(Chair and Speaker) Jeffrey P. Bratberg, The University of Rhode Island; (Speaker) Cynthia P. Koh-Knox, Purdue University

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP President's Reception

Tennessee Ballroom A, Level 2

By Invitation Only

7:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

RxPrep's Meet & Greet over Coffee & Sweets

Gaylord Restaurant, TBD Restaurant

Faculty considering an RxPrep review can meet with schools that use RxPrep and get an insider's perspective. We'll be collecting your requirements for NAPLEX preparation. Learn what's already in the works with RxPrep for the 2018 grads. Major updates: Score reporting that includes common features in popular reporting software; Stepwise approach to help students organize preparation: Chapter Basics, Core Competencies, Expertise; and Earlier annual update: Videos and RxPrep 2018 Course Book out this September!

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Tuesday, July 18

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2; Ryman Ballroom Foyer, Level 0

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Assessment SIG: Business Meeting

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

This is the annual business meeting for the Assessment SIG. The meeting will include induction of new officers and meetings in work groups for the 2017–2018 academic year.

(Chair) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) Tara L. Jenkins, Touro University California; (Speaker) Lauren S. Schlesselman, University of Connecticut

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Geriatric Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Jackson EF, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group

This business meeting will be conducted for the members of the Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group. Organization plans and ideas for the SIG will be discussed.

(Chair and Speaker) Kelechi C. Unegbu-Ogbonna, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Amber M. Hutchison, Auburn University; (Speaker) Stephanie L. Sibicky, Northeastern University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Graduate Education SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Intended Audience: Graduate Education Special Interest Group

This session will serve as the annual business meeting and networking event for the Graduate Education SIG. The purpose of this year’s business session will be to 1) discuss and approve proposed changes to SIG bylaws, mission statement, and review the SIG’s rolling two-year objectives and 2) discuss future programming topics. The discussion will explore the challenge of the training of future faculty (by graduate education & postdoctoral training) in order to identify areas of interest and needs of our SIG membership.

(Moderator) Angela K. Birnbaum, University of Minnesota; (Moderator) Roy L. Hawke, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Chair) Hai-An Zheng, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio FG, Level 0

Intended Audience: History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group

This business meeting will be conducted for the members of the History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group. Organizational plans and ideas for the SIG will be discussed, as well as planning for the SIG's standing and ad hoc committees' activities.

(Chair) David M. Baker, Western New England University; (Speaker) Michael A. Hegener, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) Ettie Rosenberg, West Coast University; (Speaker) Roseane M. Santos, South University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Knowledge Management Focus Group

Jackson CD, Level M

By Invitation Only

The purpose of this focus group is to provide the AACP Knowledge Management and Member Engagement Manager with feedback, ideas and content regarding AACP Connect and other Knowledge Management (KM) initiatives. The session will cover AACP Connect Community Administrator’s functions and examples of organizational structure in the Community document library within AACP Connect. The focus group will be comprised of secretaries of governance groups.

(Speaker) Matt Cipriani, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Leadership Development SIG: Business Meeting

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Annual Business Meeting for the Leadership Development SIG.

(Chair) Michelle L. Hilaire, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Andrew S. Bzowyckyj, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Whitney Maxwell, University of South Carolina

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Minority Faculty SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Intended Audience: Minority Faculty Special Interest Group

The Minority Faculty SIG will conduct its business meeting during this session.

(Chair) Ahmed Abdelmageed, Manchester University; (Speaker) Nicole D. Avant, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) Margarita Echeverri, Xavier University of Louisiana

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG: Business Meeting

Ryman Studio JK, Level 0

Intended Audience: Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group

Annual Business Meeting for the Pharmacogenomics SIG.

(Chair) Kristin W. Weitzel, University of Florida

7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

Please check-in for Pharmacy Education 2017 and pick-up your name badge here. We are also available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app, and help you get started with AACP Connect. Discover the new online, private community exclusively for members to communicate and collaborate with each other in a virtual home. Learn how to create your profile, post to a discussion board, upload documents, and much more using AACP Connect.

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Networking Rooms 1, 2 and 3

Presidential Boardroom A, Level M; Ryman Studios D and E, Level 0

Want to catch up with old friends, meet new ones or discuss similar interests? Want to continue the discussion from a fantastic session? Come to the Networking Rooms or schedule time at the Registration and Help Desk.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: PHIELD Workgroup: A Model for Connecting Pharmacists With Multiple Disciplines to Solve Public Health Problems

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

The PHIELD Workgroup at St. John’s University is a hub connecting faculty from numerous disciplines to foster a multidisciplinary approach for public health problem solving. This mini-session will describe the PHIELD Workgroup, and guide participants through workshop activities designed to help them make similar public health-focused connections between Pharmacy faculty and faculty from other less traditionally connected fields. This session targets clinical pharmacists, pharmacy faculty, pharmacy school administrators, and anyone with a public health interest.

(Moderator) Joshua Rickard, St. John's University; (Moderator) Mieka Smart, St. John's University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List two examples of recent (within past year) high-profile pharmacy-based or -informed public health interventions.
  2. Articulate why multidisciplinary teams are critical to solving issues that pharmacists encounter.
  3. Test your own self-beliefs of the pharmacist’s role on a multidisciplinary team, and see how your beliefs compare to those pharmacists across multiple universities.
  4. Brainstorm and discuss one potential pharmacy-based or -informed public health project with two potential partners from outside fields/disciplines.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-082-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Please…No More…Make It Stop: Effective Alternatives to Boring Narrated Slideshows on the Internet

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Continuing Professional Development Section

In a well-meaning attempt to make classroom content available online, some faculty post their lectures as 50-minute narrated slideshows. The disappointing number of student “views” their videos receive demonstrates the lack of efficacy of this format. Teachers attending this presentation who wish to “flip” their classrooms will learn tips for making online video content more effective and engaging. Alternatives to the “narrated slideshow” format will be presented and entry-level video production tools will be reviewed.

(Speaker) Gary D. Theilman, The University of Mississippi

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. List six tips for making online instructional videos more engaging.
  2. Describe how to create a “Khan Academy”-style video.
  3. List four alternatives to the “narrated slideshow” lecture format.
  4. List examples of entry-level video production software for various computer platforms.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-108-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

Deans Networking Sessions

Three concurrent sessions are scheduled for deans to engage in discussions involving topical issues associated with 1) promotion of pharmacy, 2) graduate education, and 3) dean engagement will be shared with the Council of Deans.

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Deans Networking Session 1: Focus on AACP Strategic Priority 2—How are you changing the portrait of pharmacists and pharmacy career?

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

(Moderator) Robert A. Blouin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Deans Networking Session 2: Focus on AACP Strategic Priority 4—Using the graduate education competencies & grad student career destinations

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

(Moderator) Natalie D. Eddington, University of Maryland

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Deans Networking Session 3: Dean Engagement Beyond Annual & Interim Meetings

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

(Moderator) Anne Y. Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Innovations in Teaching Award

Presidential Ballroom CE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group

Recipients of the 2017 Innovations in Teaching Award will present their winning submissions.

  • Janet Cooley and Kate Johnson, The University of Arizona, presenting Implementation of an Interprofessional Medication Therapy Management Experience
  • Jennifer M. Malinowski, Wilkes University; Teresa Lacey, Commonwealth Medical College, Linda Thomas, The Wright Center for Primary Care, presenting Value-Driven Pharmacy Student-Led Rapid Cycle Process Engagement in Experiential and Didactic Settings

(Moderator) S. William Zito, St. John's University

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Experiential Education Section Presents:

Quality Assurance and Improvement in Experiential Education Programs: Results of a National Study &

Setting Standards for Assessment of Student Learning and Skill Development in Experiential Education

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

Advanced/ Advanced

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Assessment Special Interest Group

Results of a national study summarizing what leaders in experiential education describe as essential elements of quality assurance and continuous quality improvement for experiential education programs will be presented. Session participants will dialogue about frameworks for successful program models and future directions for research in this area. Session participants will also engage in critical reflection of their own program to identify any area(s) for improvement and develop action item(s) for use after the meeting.

Assessment of student learning and skill development in experiential education environments is variable. How will schools and colleges of pharmacy be confident that students are at an acceptable standard upon graduation? A standard of achievement must be defined and a process implemented to ensure consistent assessment of learners. This session will share a process utilized to develop standards to assess pre-APPE and practice readiness.

(Moderator) Kelly C. Lee, University of California, San Diego; (Speaker) Mitra Assemi, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Teresa A. O'Sullivan, University of Washington

(Moderator) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Macary W. Marciniak, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Nicole Pinelli, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Graduate Education SIG: Cross-Culture Awareness and Diversity Recruitment

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Graduate Education Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Continuing Professional Development Section

Diversification of the scientific workforce and cultural sensitivity awareness is integral to research and educational innovation. However, recruiting diverse professional and graduate students and cultural sensitivity training is a challenge across many colleges of pharmacy. This session will present the barriers to recruiting diverse students, provide strategies to overcome these barriers, and present an abbreviated workshop of a program that can be applied to other colleges of pharmacy.

(Moderator) Justin Gatwood, The University of Tennessee; (Moderator) Angela K. Birnbaum, University of Minnesota; (Chair) Hai-An Zheng, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) James Beaudoin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker); (Speaker) L'Aurelle A. Johnson, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Tojan Rahhal, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the barriers of recruiting URM into college of pharmacy graduate programs.
  2. Discuss effective and ineffective strategies in recruiting URM.
  3. Present the outcomes of a student-developed, student-led cross-cultural workshop at a school of pharmacy.
  4. Discuss the successes and challenges experienced by other student-led cross-cultural workshops at multiple schools of pharmacy after replicating the initial program.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-089-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Public Health SIG: Improving Curricular and Co-Curricular Student Involved Immunization Outreach

Lincoln A, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Public Health Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

The purpose of this session is to identify opportunities to develop curricular and co-curricular student involved immunization outreach activities that will help students gain skills in addressing vaccine hesitancy, debunking vaccine myths, proactively communicating vaccine needs and improving vaccine administration technique. To support immunization experiential activities, this session will also discuss strategies for integrating didactic immunization training into existing curriculum.

(Moderator) Jordan R. Covvey, Duquesne University; (Speaker) Jeffery A. Goad, Chapman University; (Speaker) Stephanie F. James, Regis University; (Speaker) Christina Mnatzaganian, University of California, San Diego

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Develop a plan for curricular and co-curricular immunization experiential outreach activities.
  2. Discuss ideas on interprofessional immunization outreach efforts that improve students' understanding of roles and responsibilities.
  3. Identify ways to introduce and practice specific, strongly worded vaccine messages, consistent with the recommendations of the CDC and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee.
  4. Determine the most effective way for students to gain the necessary skills and attitudes to address vaccine concerns of patients, parents and law makers.
  5. Discuss curricular strategies for the integration of immunization training in the didactic series.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-090-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Got Empathy? Integrating and Assessing Curricular Initiatives to Address Student Empathy

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Does it seem challenging to integrate and assess activities that impact student attitudes? How do we encourage students to develop a patient-centered communication skill like empathy, which is important for appropriately addressing diverse patient groups? This program will address these issues by discussing: 1) empathy and related Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)/CAPE standards, 2) empathy assessment instruments, and 3) innovative empathy-fostering educational interventions. Participants will use a worksheet to actively identify relevant curricular areas for potential integration and assessment.

(Speaker) Aleda M. Chen, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Jan Kavookjian, Auburn University; (Speaker) Mary E. Kiersma, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Emily Laswell, Cedarville University; (Speaker) Alice Lim, University of the Sciences

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize the evidence base for empathy being a patient-centered communication skill that impacts patient health behaviors (e.g., medication adherence) and outcomes.
  2. Describe potential barriers to incorporating and assessing empathy in a curriculum.
  3. Evaluate methods for assessing students’ empathy.
  4. Develop a plan to integrate and assess empathy throughout the curriculum.
  5. Discuss solutions to barriers for incorporating empathy.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-091-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Guidance and Discussions From Pharmacy Journals: How to Be Successful In Publishing Your Work

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Library and Information Science Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Graduate Education Special Interest Group

This program will provide resources to prepare and submit manuscripts to pharmacy journals. Editors’ guidance on tailoring submissions to journals and areas of agreed overlap for publishing success will be provided. The session will be structured into sections: 1) tips to being a successful writer: initial submissions and reviewer responses; 2) connection of successful reviewing to writing; 3) journal-specific guidance (submission areas/author instructions); 4) roundtable discussion. Examples will illustrate tips for success.

(Moderator) Spencer E. Harpe, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, University of New England; (Speaker) Daniel Cobaugh, American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Milap C. Nahata, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Jeanine P. Abrons, The University of Iowa

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Integrating the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process Into the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Tennessee Ballroom B, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section

Attendees will gain insight for laying the patient care process foundation early in the Pharm.D. curriculum, and see examples of how other schools have integrated the process in didactic and experiential learning. Attendees will draft an action plan for incorporating the patient care process in the curriculum at their home school, including both classroom and experiential learning, and the rationale for why it is important to introduce the patient care process early and often.

(Speaker) Keri D. Hager, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Melissa A. McGivney, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Beth Phillips, The University of Georgia

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the rationale for early introduction of the patient care process in the Pharm.D. professional curriculum.
  2. Describe opportunities to utilize active learning in the didactic and experiential curriculum to practice the patient care process.
  3. Design a plan for laying the foundation of the patient care process in your school’s curriculum.
  4. Draft a concept map to integrate classroom and experiential learning within your school’s curriculum.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-092-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

R&R Lounge: Recharge and Reconnect

Presidential Chamber B, Level 2

Sponsored by Liaison International
Liaison Logo

Make time to stop by the complimentary R&R Lounge to unwind, check your e-mail and charge your phone, tablet or laptop. A variety of fruit-infused waters will help refresh you for your next session or appointment.

8:45 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Deans Networking Sessions: Wrap Up

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

Salient points from the three concurrent dean networking sessions on 1) promotion of pharmacy, 2) graduate education, and 3) dean engagement will be shared with the Council of Deans.

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Rapid-Cycle Improvement for Agile Curricular Transformation in Interprofessional Education

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Assessment Special Interest Group

Colleges of pharmacy are moving from planning for interprofessional education (IPE) to implementing and expanding these experiences. Traditional course assessment models are delayed and reactive. Rapid-cycle improvement models offer an agile alternative. Attendees will gain experience utilizing the Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle to improve the design and implementation of their IPE curricula. Activities will be facilitated by instructors who have utilized this tool, along with interprofessional huddles and debriefs, to transform a foundational IPE curriculum in real-time.

(Speaker) Lucas G. Hill, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Veronica S. Young, The University of Texas at Austin

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the role of rapid-cycle improvement models in curricular transformation.
  2. Apply PDSA concepts to improve the design and implementation of IPE curricula.
  3. Identify facilitating factors and barriers to implementing a rapid-cycle improvement model for IPE curricular change.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-093-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Too Many Cooks: Coordinating Exam Creation With a Large Number of Question Writers

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Creating an exam when one to two people write the questions is straightforward. What if 15–20 faculty are contributing questions? Faculty responsible for creating assessments will learn a coordination process that also maps questions to competencies, avoids educational “silos,” provides peer review of question writing and mentors junior faculty and residents. The process also meets challenges related to faculty based on distant campuses, quality assurance, providing individualized feedback to students and maintaining security of exam questions.

(Moderator) Daniel M. Riche, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Kayla R. Stover, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Gary D. Theilman, The University of Mississippi

At the end of this presentation, the attendee will be able to:

  1. Describe the structure of an exam committee that provides peer feedback to question writers and coordinates development of assessments.
  2. Describe the workflow of that exam committee.
  3. List steps that can be taken to provide individualized feedback to learners and prevent distribution of exam questions to other classes.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-094-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Highlighting #RxInnovation: Postcards to Your Legislators

Tennessee Registration Desk, Level 2

Feeling frustrated about the dwindling appreciation for research and STEM education on Capitol Hill? Want to make your voice heard but don’t know where to start? Now you can join the conversation on the pivotal role that research at colleges and schools of pharmacy plays in moving the health research enterprise forward. AACP staff will be on hand to help you craft your message, and you’ll be able to write a postcard to your legislator that shares your story of pharmacy research impacting lives for the better.

9:00 a.m.–Noon

Spouses/Guests Hospitality Room

Washington A, Level M

9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) Foundation Information Desk

Presidential Lobby, Level 2

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2; Ryman Ballroom Foyer, Level 0

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Innovative Games for Teaching Infectious Diseases—In Bugs and Drugs, Should We Play to Learn?

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

Mastering the fundamentals of infectious diseases requires students to memorize large volumes of material about pathogens, antibiotics, patients, and the interactions between the three. Transitioning the hours students spend studying lists and flashcard to a gaming environment can increase material retention, decrease study fatigue, and appeal to students’ competitive nature that motivates them to interact with the material. Discover how to integrate effective active learning strategies within your infectious diseases curriculum in this mini session.

(Speaker) Lauren R. Biehle, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Meghan N. Jeffres, University of Colorado

10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Resources for Teaching and Practicing Evidence-Based Pharmacogenomics

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group; Library and Information Science Section; Pharmacy Practice Section

Pharmacogenomics is one of the most important emerging fields within pharmacy practice. Pharmacy graduates in all settings must be prepared to integrate pharmacogenomics information into their practice. The session will discuss an approach to integrating evidence-based pharmacogenomics decision-making into the didactic and experiential curricula. It will also highlight evidence-based resources that can be used by pharmacists, scientists, and librarians to answer related drug information questions.

(Speaker) Robert D. Beckett, Manchester University; (Speaker) David F. Kisor, Manchester University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe approaches taken to integrate pharmacogenomics throughout the didactic and experiential curriculum.
  2. Describe resources that can be used to answer pharmacogenomics-related drug information questions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-083-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Topical Roundtable Session 3

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

The list of roundtables and facilitators can be found on the AACP meeting app.

(Moderator) Edward M. DeSimone II, Creighton University

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Grit. Resilience. Performance: Tales from the Trenches

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Pharmacy educators consistently seek predictors of academic performance. Grit and resilience are emerging non-cognitive constructs that may offer insight into student success and well-being. This session will (1) summarize the literature constructively, (2) report on two studies of this topic from pharmacy education, and (3) engage faculty, administrators and student services personnel in identifying actionable strategies to increase the ability of students to perform while managing stress and adversity.

(Speaker) Tina Brock, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Amy M. Franks, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Katherine Gruenberg, University of California: San Francisco; (Speaker) Kristopher Harrell, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Conan MacDougall, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Adam Pate, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Jaclyn Stoffel, University of Kentucky

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current literature and evidence pertaining to grit and resilience.
  2. Characterize relationships between grit scores, learning strategies, and academic performance among pharmacy students.
  3. Collaboratively identify strategies for promoting resilience and stress management.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-084-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Making Interprofessional Education Intentional: Reframing Activities in Existing Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This session will describe in detail the development of two specific Interprofessional Education (IPE) activities in existing Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs) and discuss how these activities are transferable to other practice settings. Methods to raise learners’ awareness related to IPE, team communication, and role delineation will be presented and applied. Practical tools will be discussed to integrate multiple learner types with group projects and assessment measures that give preceptors the ability to evaluate learning.

(Speaker) Leila Islam, University of Maryland School of Medicine; (Speaker) Daniel Mickool, University of New England; (Speaker) Kathleen J. Pincus, University of Maryland

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify potential opportunities for incorporation of IPE activities from existing APPEs.
  2. List methods to increase learner awareness of IPE.
  3. List methods to facilitate learner reflection after IPE activities.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-120-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Using A Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter (TOSCE) to Assess Interprofessional Team Skills

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section

Interprofessional education assessment tools will be reviewed followed by personal experience and audience application of two modified McMaster Ottawa Scales, an assessment tool to provide students team functioning feedback after a TOSCE. The first experience evaluates interprofessional skills before and after a four-day real-world experience with pharmacy and physician assistant students using a TOSCE. The second example involves providing formative feedback to pharmacy, occupational therapy, physician assistant and nursing student teams after two TOSCE cases.

(Moderator and Speaker) Mary Beth O 'Connell, Wayne State University; (Speaker) SaeByul Ma, University of Southern California

10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

COD/COF Task Force Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process (PPCP): Accelerating Change in Pharmacy Education and Practice Workshop

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Introductory

It is our goal that schools of pharmacy will teach and assess competencies associated with the JCPP PPCP across classroom, simulation and experiential education settings by the 2018 Annual Meeting. We are now halfway to this goal. This workshop will include reports and updates as follows: report from the Catalyst Management Team on creating urgency and building engagement; report from the Performance Accountability Team on an Academy-wide survey; report from the Learning Engagement Team on Webinars and resource library; presentations of pearls from Faculty Champions; and a PPCP Champion Roundtables on curricular mapping, didactic courses, skills labs, experiential courses, faculty/preceptor training and assessment.

(Speaker) Natalie D. Eddington, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Anne Y. Lin, Notre Dame of Maryland University; (Speaker) Mary Roth McClurg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Todd D. Sorensen, University of Minnesota

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: From Recitation to Experiential Learning: Prepping All Students for Political Advocacy in Pharmacy

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Schools of pharmacy and state pharmacy associations often naturally create mutually beneficial relationships, especially in the area of political advocacy for the profession. This session describes the incorporation of a multi-faceted political advocacy module into a required first year course, beginning with a team-based recitation and culminating with a faculty-led experiential learning opportunity at the state capitol. The perspectives of both the state pharmacy association and the school of pharmacy will be presented.

(Speaker) Greg Reybold, Georgia Pharmacy Association; (Speaker) Lindsey H. Welch, The University of Georgia

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe a multi-faceted approach to teaching political advocacy for all students in concert with a state pharmacy association.
  2. Identify the resources needed to incorporate a multi-faceted political advocacy module for all students into a curriculum.
  3. Discuss the benefits and challenges of a multi-faceted political advocacy module from the perspective of both a school of pharmacy and a state association.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-109-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Mini Session: “Science-Practice Connect”—In-Class Activities to Connect Basic Science and Clinical Practice Concepts Across Didactic-Years

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Biological Sciences Section

Pharmacy curricula should be designed and delivered in a way to produce life-long learners who are able to apply a broad knowledge base to various clinical situations. We summarize a series of in-class activities designed to help students actively create ways to connect concepts presented in science and clinical practice coursework in different professional-years of the program through application of real-life cases. We discuss implementation, examples of in-class activities, performance data, challenges, and faculty/student perspectives.

(Speaker) Fawzy A. Elbarbry, Pacific University Oregon

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Assess the need for implementing in-class Science-Practice Connect activities.
  2. Discuss strategies to overcome the limitations of implementing in-class Science-Practice Connect activities.
  3. Develop collaboration with other institutions in the area of curricular integration.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-086-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning Editorial Board Meeting

Presidential Mezzanine Level, Presidential Boardroom A

By Invitation Only

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PCAT Advisory Committee Meeting

Jackson CD, Level M

Closed committee meeting.

(Chair) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Editorial Board Luncheon

Jackson AB, Level M

By Invitation Only

(Moderator) Gayle A. Brazeau, University of New England

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

This session provides all meeting attendees the opportunity to hear the business coming before the Final Session of the House of Delegates. All attendees may comment on proposed policies, resolutions and other business.

(Chair) Bradley C. Cannon, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker of the House) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Mini Session: An Alternative to Traditional Student Ratings of Teaching for Course CQI

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

The ratings and comments collected in a traditional course evaluation may not provide the information needed for continuous quality improvement. This session will provide faculty and administrators with an evaluation alternative that focuses on identifying the strongest elements of the course, as well as the top priorities for improvement using a sample of students and an asynchronous, online consensus development method. This process can assist in recognizing course strengths and collecting constructive ideas for change.

(Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Lara Kerwin, St Louis College of Pharmacy

1:30 p.m.–2:00p.m.

Mini Session: Beyond Self Awareness: Teaching Moral Competence

Washington B, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Health Care Ethics Special Interest Group; Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

CAPE and Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) set standards for Pharm.D. graduates to be self-aware, ethical and professional, but the current political and internet era sends mixed messages. Educators struggle to instill moral competence, ethical behavior and reflective practices. One method of fostering lasting improvement in cognitive-moral development is through dilemma discussion (Bian, Kohlberg; Schliifli et al.; Lind). This workshop will introduce moral agency and engage attendees in simple activities that teach moral competence through work by Lind.

(Speaker) Wendy Duncan, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) Julie Marty-Pearson, California Health Sciences University; (Speaker) William Ofstad, California Health Sciences University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Apply Lind’s Konstanz Method of Dilemma Discussion teaching moral competence.
  2. Map cognitive-moral development to CAPE Outcomes 2013 and ACPE Standards 2016.
  3. Identify common ethical dilemmas students face in school and practice that could be used for future dilemma discussions at home institutions.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-077-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Developing Professional Behaviors, Attitudes and Critical Thinking With Team-Based Activities Via JCPP Modeling

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Faculty are challenged to create learning environments where professional behaviors, attitudes and skills ("soft skills") are developed in preparation for APPEs. This program outlines a method of integrating problem- and team-based learning sessions, modeled with the JCPP process, into a didactic course. Sessions target a particular skill development requiring students to utilize critical thinking and problem-solving skills while maturing "soft skills." The process summarizes with a self-reflective assessment that includes professional and life-long learning aspects.

(Speaker) Michael Gonyeau, Northeastern University; (Speaker) J. Andrew Skirvin, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Jenny A. Van Amburgh, Northeastern University

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: From Classroom Active Learning Innovations to Publication

Ryman Ballroom, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: Biological Sciences Section; Pharmaceutics Section; Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group

The development of innovative educational approaches to enhance student learning provides the potential to utilize one’s skills as a researcher/scholar, resulting potentially in a peer-reviewed publication. However, this requires planning with the end in mind, specifically what would the manuscript need to be a successful peer-reviewed publication. Based upon what is known about active learning, one can develop the key elements that will transform your innovative active learning approaches to a successful peer-reviewed publication.

(Moderator) Daniel R. Kennedy, Western New England University; (Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, University of New England; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the key foundational elements needed for any successful scholarship of teaching and learning.
  2. Identify effective study design methods to demonstrate student learning from your active learning innovations.
  3. Describe key elements of an introduction to their manuscript.
  4. Identify effective tables and figures needed to demonstrate student learning from their study.
  5. Outline what are the key elements for their results and discussion section of the manuscript.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-057-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Bylaws and Policy Development Committee Executive Session

Lincoln B, Level M

Closed committee meeting.

(Chair) Bradley C. Cannon, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker of the House) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Assessment SIG: Preparing Your Self-Study for Standards 2016: What We Learned from ACPE Accreditation Visits During 2016–17

Tennessee Ballroom C, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

The 2016–2017 year saw the first wave of Pharm.D. programs go through the accreditation process under Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016. Pharm.D. programs in this first wave were tasked with articulating how they are meeting the standards. Key personnel from ACPE will share feedback from evaluation teams and representatives from institutions recommended by ACPE will share their experiences. Participants interested in learning best practices for preparing for the self-study process should attend.

(Moderator) Tara L. Jenkins, Touro University California; (Chair) Michael J. Fulford, The University of Georgia; (Speaker) J. Gregory Boyer, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; (Speaker) Mary E. Kiersma, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Geriatric Pharmacy and Pediatric Pharmacy SIGs: Age Related Special Populations: How to Incorporate Geriatric and Pediatric Topics Into Pharmacy Curricula

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Geriatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group; Pediatric Pharmacy Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Increasing pediatric and geriatric patient populations and changes in the healthcare system requiring improved patient outcomes dictate the need for a greater emphasis on geriatrics and pediatrics training for all pharmacists. An approach to meet this need is integrating special populations (geriatric, pediatric) education across the Pharm.D. curriculum. In this session, pharmacy practice faculty, lab faculty and administrators will explore curriculum mapping, strategic integration and assessment as it relates to an integrated special populations curriculum.

(Moderator) Mary A. Worthington, Samford University; (Speaker) Jeannine M. Conway, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Amber M. Hutchison, Auburn University; (Speaker) Peter N. Johnson, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Stephanie L. Sibicky, Northeastern University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Summarize how CAPE-related competencies can be developed by geriatric and pediatric education.
  2. Discuss challenges and potential solutions to implementing integrated geriatric and pediatric education in the Pharm.D. curriculum.
  3. Outline steps colleges of pharmacy may take to ensure the workforce is prepared to care for patients at both ends of the age spectrum.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-078-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: What I Learned About My Students’ Writing Skills From Teaching the History of Pharmacy

Ryman Studio ABC, Level 0

Introductory

Intended Audience: History of Pharmacy Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Library and Information Science Section

History of Pharmacy courses and research projects provide ideal places for students to practice literature searches and exercise narrative writing skills. In this session, instructors will share some of their experiences guiding writing projects as well as the results of some of their best student papers. Each speaker will highlight the techniques they have used to stimulate student writing and the development of papers, some that were deserving of consideration for publication.

(Moderator) Michael Hegener, University of Cincinnati; (Speaker) David M. Baker, Western New England University; (Speaker) Gregory Higby, University of Wisconsin-Madison; (Speaker) Eric J. Mack, California Northstate University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the connection between narrative writing skills and patient communication skills.
  2. Describe three different types of historical writing projects that engage pharmacy students.
  3. Demonstrate how historical writing can add texture and meaning to the pharmacy student experience.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-079-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG: From Bench to Bedside: Keeping Pace With the Changing Landscape of Pharmacogenomics Education

Jackson EF, Level M

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

This program will provide an overview of pharmacogenomics education, including collaborative national programs, curricular trends, and current teaching strategies. Presenters will review changes in clinical practice and genomic medicine technology that are driving a shift in the focus of pharmacogenomics education from foundational science knowledge to patient-centered applications.

(Chair) Kristin W. Weitzel, University of Florida; (Speaker) Christina L. Aquilante, University of Colorado; (Speaker) David F. Kisor, Manchester University; (Speaker) Grace M. Kuo, University of California, San Diego

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Organizational Culture and Citizenship Behaviors to Facilitate Planning, Faculty Quality of Worklife and Institutional Effectiveness

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Leadership Development Special Interest Group

Organizational Culture is “the way things are done around here.” Strategic planning should be preceded by assessing OC. Organizational Citizenship Behaviors are a manifestation of collegiality associated with morale and productivity. OCBs inform climate and are performed as a result of it. This program aims to assist senior faculty/administrators in establishing a culture that promotes OCBs, to all faculty on exhibiting OCBs, and to demonstrate how to fend off poor OCBs by others.

(Speaker) Shane Desselle, Touro University California; (Speaker) Erin R. Holmes, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Meagen M. Rosenthal, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) David P. Zgarrick, Northeastern University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe informal and formal mechanisms for assessing organizational culture and organizational citizenship behaviors in a college/school of pharmacy.
  2. Describe how to leverage assessments of culture and citizenship behaviors into more effective strategic planning.
  3. Identify behaviors that are extra-role versus in-role and that which are especially important to the productivity and well-being of work colleagues.
  4. Describe mechanisms for administrators and for faculty at all levels/ranks to shape an organizational culture that promote citizenship behaviors and other positive attributes that encourage high morale and productivity.
  5. Determine proper courses of action to take when a colleague exhibits poor organizational citizenship behavior toward you, another person, and/or the institution in general.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-080-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Department Chair Program

Ryman Studio L, Level 0

A networking session for department chairs. During this session, chairs will be asked to speak to the current topics that are rewarding, or challenging for them in their position during roundtable sessions.

(Moderator) Anandi V. Law, Western University of Health Sciences

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Across Cohort Integrated Activities Through Required Programmatic Co-Curricular Sessions

Lincoln CDE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

Pharm.D. students benefit from participation in co-curricular activities where they work with students from cohorts of other graduating classes. Support systems and mentorship relationships are created through integrated activities, with these undertakings being crucial in the development of professional awareness and self-awareness. This session will discuss the implementation of a required co-curricular program aimed at supplementing student development. The target audience includes student services/affairs and assessment personnel, and/or faculty from colleges/schools evaluating co-curricular activities.

(Speaker) David Fuentes, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Jeremy Hughes, Pacific University Oregon

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the implementation and refinement of on-campus required co-curricular activities.
  2. Discuss the barriers and benefits of cross-cohort participation in on-campus co-curricular activities involving small group and large group discussions.
  3. Describe the impact of required cross-cohort co-curricular activities on the student experience and the development of peer mentorship relationships.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-087-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mini Session: Encouraging Metacognition Using Exam Wrappers to Enhance Learning From the Exam

Tennessee Ballroom DE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Assessment Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Ever wonder what students learn from an exam? This session targeted at course coordinators and all faculty members involved in student examinations will introduce attendees to a useful metacognitive tool, the “exam wrapper.” This tool requires minimal faculty time, encourages metacognition and enhances learning from the exam. Speakers will describe implementation and results from a single institution with active audience participation and co-development of concrete strategies to use this tool at your institution.

(Speaker) Elizabeth M. Lafitte, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Adam Pate, The University of Louisiana at Monroe

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Explain the benefits of exam wrappers in exam reviews.
  2. Create an exam wrapper.
  3. Formulate implementation plans for respective courses.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-088-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Mini Session: No Excuses: Using Simulations to Address the Socioeconomic Impact on Provider Accountability

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Health Disparities and Cultural Competence Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Public Health Special Interest Group

With reimbursement focused on patient outcomes, this session will highlight a simulation exercise developed to introduce and connect concepts of socioeconomic status, interprofessional collaboration and patient outcomes in the didactic setting. This session will introduce the goals of the simulation, along with steps for development and incorporation into the curriculum. Anticipated challenges and related CAPE outcomes will also be discussed. The target audience includes faculty in the public health, social administration and ambulatory care sectors.

(Speaker) Carriann E. Richey Smith, Butler University; (Speaker) Jessica Wilhoite, Butler University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Identify the role poverty simulations can plan in empathy toward low socioeconomic patients.
  2. Examine use of a provider simulation to integrate socioeconomic considerations with clinical cases.
  3. Outline integration of these concepts into a new course series and case-based textbook.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-110-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break

Tennessee Lobby A and Presidential Lobby, Level 2; Ryman Ballroom Foyer, Level 0

3:30 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Tuesday General Session: Reconciliation

Presidential Ballroom CDE, Level 2

Introductory

Regina Holliday is a Maryland-based patient advocate and artist known for painting a series of murals depicting the need for clarity and transparency in medical records. This advocacy mission was inspired by her husband Frederick Allen Holliday II and his struggle to receive appropriate care. Afflicted with kidney cancer, Fred suffered poor care coordination, a lack of access to data and a series of medical errors and, as a result, lost his battle. These institutional flaws spurred Holliday to try to improve care for her husband, as well as for all patients who are abused in this way. As a result, Fred’s death inspired Holliday to use painting as a catalyst for change.

With her passion for advocating for patients to receive timely access to their healthcare data, her artwork became part of the national healthcare debate. Backed by her own patient and caregiving experiences, Regina Holliday travels the globe heralding her message of patient empowerment and inclusion in healthcare decision-making, offering guidance on crowd funding in healthcare. She fearlessly stands before officials and practitioners demanding a thoughtful dialogue on the role patients play in their own healthcare.

This session also brings recognition to the importance of engaging with communities and recognizes the recipients of the Lawrence C. Weaver Transformative Community Service Award and the Rufus A. Lyman Award.

(Moderator) Joseph T. DiPiro, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Regina Holliday

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of patient-centered care.
  2. Discuss the outcomes of patient-centered care.
  3. Identify ways to improve the health-care system to affect positive change for patients.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-036-L04-P, 1.75 Contact Hours)

5:15 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Closing Reception

Tennessee Ballroom, Level 2

Name Badge Required; Don't forget your drink tickets!

Say farewell to the Music City by wearing your blue jeans, boots, and cowboy hats! Grab a bite and a beverage and take advantage of this final opportunity to socialize and network with old and new friends.

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Wednesday, July 19

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Presidential Lobby, Level 2

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Sign-In

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

All delegates must sign in for the Final Session of the House of Delegates so the Credentials Committee can determine the quorum for the conduct of business.

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Registration and Help Desk

Presidential Registration Desk, Level 2

Please check-in for Pharmacy Education 2017 and pick-up your name badge here. We are also available to answer your general meeting questions, assist with the AACP meeting app, and help you get started with AACP Connect. Discover the new online, private community exclusively for members to communicate and collaborate with each other in a virtual home. Learn how to create your profile, post to a discussion board, upload documents, and much more using AACP Connect.

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Incorporating a Longitudinal Progressive Disclosure Case in Multiple Therapeutics Courses

Lincoln C, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Curriculum Special Interest Group

Case-based learning is an integral part of pharmacy education. Often, stand-alone cases are used for different disease states, which may result in segmented learning that does not simulate realistic longitudinal patient care. This session presents a novel approach of using a progressive disclosure case surrounding a single patient throughout two therapeutics courses in an effort to help students better implement the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process. Assessment strategies for this method will also be described.

(Speaker) Marian Gaviola, University of North Texas System; (Speaker) Meredith L. Howard, University of North Texas System

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the potential advantages of using progressive disclosure case studies in various teaching environments.
  2. List the steps for the development of a progressive disclosure case in courses that would benefit from case-based learning.
  3. Identify specific topics or cases within a curriculum that may be improved with the use of a progressive disclosure case.
  4. Describe progressive disclosure case assessment strategies to evaluate student competence in using the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-103-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Confronting Multiple Choice Questions: A Strategy for Moving from Flawed to (Nearly) Flawless

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Continuing Professional Development Section; Assessment Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section

Multiple Choice Questions are used commonly to assess students’ learning. It has been established in the literature that flaws in MCQ writing occur frequently. Major contributors to these flaws may include the growing demands in patient care responsibilities at the practice sites of clinical faculty members. The purpose of this mini-session is to share our innovative paired approach to professional development in MCQ item writing, the limitations of this strategy and barriers to maintaining high quality exam questions.

(Speaker) Jennifer McCann, Butler University; (Speaker) Cathy Ramey, Butler University

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Discuss the consequences of a flawed MCQ on pharmacy exams.
  2. Identify common flaws observed in MCQ item writing per the NBME.
  3. Recommend corrections to observed flaws in MCQ writing.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-095-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Adaptation of Supplemental Instruction (SI), a Pre-Remediation, Peer-Led Academic Assistance Program, to Pharm.D. Programs

Lincoln DE, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Student Services Personnel Special Interest Group; Pharmaceutics Section

Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a pre-remediation, peer-led academic assistance program widely used in undergraduate education and selected healthcare programs. Few reports of SI in Pharm.D. education exist (Mosley, et al, 2013), however SI is well-suited to Pharm.D. education (Maize, et al, 2010), as SI can help students adjust to the academic rigors of professional programs. The adaptation of SI to three Pharm.D. programs will be reviewed, including administrative support, leader selection, key components and outcomes.

(Moderator) Suzanne Clark, California Northstate University; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University; (Speaker) Parto Khansari, California Northstate University; (Speaker) David F. Maize, University of the Incarnate Word

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Assessment of SOAP Notes in Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

Presidential Boardroom, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Pharmacy Practice Section; Assessment Special Interest Group

Colleges and schools of pharmacy frequently instruct students to document patient care activities through SOAP notes. How pharmacy programs assess this documentation can vary greatly between institutions. The Laboratory SIG Assessment Committee collected rubrics from colleges and schools of pharmacy across the nation. Results of the rubrics’ content analysis will be presented. Audience members will learn common methods and considerations when assessing patient care documentation and that also align with the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process.

(Speaker) Courtney L. Bradley, High Point University; (Speaker) Jeanne E. Frenzel, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Jennifer Kirwin, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Karen R. Sando, University of Florida; (Speaker) Elizabeth T. Skoy, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Elizabeth M. Urteaga, University of the Incarnate Word

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe current methods used to assess SOAP notes in colleges and schools of pharmacy.
  2. Identify common and imperative assessment criteria when evaluating patient care documentation.
  3. Discuss the alignment of the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process with SOAP note documentation.
  4. Describe steps to test validity and reliability of a designed rubric to assess patient care documentation.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-097-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Building Better Pedagogic Research: Laying the Foundation for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Presidential Ballroom B, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Curriculum Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group; Experiential Education Section

Though a growing number of pharmacy educators are engaging in the scholarship of teaching, faculty often have less formal training in this area. Using educational research strategies that improve rigor and promote applicability is critical for advancing scholarly work across pharmacy and beyond. This session will provide participants with a foundation in pedagogical research by incorporating experiences from individuals who have either developed practice based educational research or have been formally trained as educational researchers.

(Speaker) Antonio Bush, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Jacqueline McLaughlin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Adam M. Persky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define standards associated with educational research.
  2. Identify research designs and methods associated with quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research.
  3. Describe pitfalls commonly encountered in the course of designing and conducting educational research.
  4. Refer to resources that can be used to better design and execute educational research.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-098-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Coaching Skills Toolkit: Training Faculty and Preceptors for Interprofessional Practice

Presidential Ballroom A, Level 2

Advanced

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Experiential Education Section

Dealing with the emotions, hierarchy and politics often involved in interprofessional practice can be difficult to navigate for faculty and preceptors, much less students. Participants will learn coaching skills that can be used to facilitate communication between practice partners and students about such difficult situations. Through use of video scenarios and active learning, participants will learn and practice skills to be used with students and to teach to preceptors from the practice setting.

(Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington; (Speaker) Julie Haizlip, University of Virginia School of Nursing; (Speaker) Sarah Shrader, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Mayumi Willgerodt, University of Washington Bothell Nursing School

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Development of Pharmacy-Based Disease Management Programs Utilizing Point-of-Care Tests

Presidential Ballroom CE, Level 2

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Social and Administrative Sciences Section; Public Health Special Interest Group

As more community pharmacies implement disease management services using point-of-care testing, pharmacy faculty will be called on to prepare students to deliver these services and to assist in developing and assessing the outcomes of these programs. This session is designed to present faculty members with the tools necessary to train students in point-of-care testing and assist pharmacies in all aspects of developing and assessing a point-of-care disease management service, including clinical, legal, and economic considerations.

(Speaker) Alex Adams, Idaho State Board of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Michael E. Klepser, Ferris State University; (Speaker) Donald G. Klepser, University of Nebraska Medical Center

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the elements necessary for a sustainable community pharmacy-based point-of-care testing program.
  2. Discuss the role of pharmacy faculty in supporting the development of a community pharmacy-based point-of-care testing program.
  3. Develop a wrap-around service (template protocol or research project) to assist in the implementation of a community pharmacy-based point-of-care testing program.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-099-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Utilizing an Intentional Model of Apprenticeship to Cultivate, Multiply and Transform Leaders

Ryman Studio JK, Level 0

Advanced

Intended Audience: Leadership Development Special Interest Group; Curriculum Special Interest Group; Social and Administrative Sciences Section

Leaders define culture. Information and knowledge are good, but they are not enough for lasting transformation. Utilizing a simple, scalable and sustainable model rooted in both self-awareness and emotional intelligence visual tools, pharmacy school administrators, faculty and students will have the opportunity to experience first-hand the power of the apprenticeship process. This program will incorporate apprenticeship for the purposes of transforming leadership behavior as opposed to using information for the purposes of knowledge.

(Moderator) Mary L. Euler, West Virginia University; (Moderator) Alan R. Spies, GiANT Worldwide; (Speaker) Gina C. Craft, The University of Louisiana at Monroe; (Speaker) Kem P. Krueger, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Mary K. Onysko, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Cathy L. Worrall, South Carolina College of Pharmacy

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Develop greater awareness for the need for intentional leader development.
  2. Describe the process of apprenticeship as it relates to multiplication.
  3. Apply and articulate a leadership tool to a fellow participant.

Application-based (0581-0000-17-100-L04-P, 1.50 Contact Hours)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Designing Performance-Based Assessments: Application of the Absorb-Do-Connect Learning Framework

Lincoln C, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Pharmacy Practice Section; Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group; Assessment Special Interest Group

The session will demonstrate how the Absorb-Do-Connect learning framework by William Horton can be used to design assessment of professional competencies performed within various simulated healthcare settings. The session will specifically demonstrate how structured rubrics can be used within the Absorb-Do-Connect learning framework to longitudinally assess the intersection of knowledge-based and skill-based professional competencies via performance-based assessments.

(Speaker) Casey Gallimore, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Speaker) Edward Portillo, University of Wisconsin–Madison

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Define the Absorb-Do-Connect learning framework as described by William Horton.
  2. Describe how structured rubrics can be used within the Absorb-Do-Connect learning framework to longitudinally assess the intersection of knowledge-based and skill-based competencies via performance-based assessments.
  3. Apply the Absorb-Do-Connect learning framework to the development and implementation of a performance-based assessment.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-101-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Mini Session: Utilizing an Innovative Team-Based Model for Clinical Faculty at Shared Practice Sites

Washington B, Level M

Introductory

Intended Audience: Experiential Education Section; Pharmacy Practice Section; Administrative Services Section

This session highlights opportunities and challenges of an innovative, team-based clinical faculty practice model. This approach pairs faculty partners within practice sites to facilitate coverage for clinical duties, precepting, and scholarly activities. This model intends to reduce the stress and burnout clinical faculty members face as part-time practitioners and educators during their split time between clinical- and faculty- required activities. This session is intended for clinical faculty, administrators, and learners considering a career in academia.

(Speaker) Hannah Fudin, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Katie L. Traylor, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Kyle Turner, The University of Utah

At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  1. Describe an innovative model for establishing clinical faculty practice sites.
  2. Illustrate three potential advantages of a paired clinical faculty model.
  3. Discuss strategies to implement a paired clinical faculty model at another institution.

Knowledge-based (0581-0000-17-102-L04-P, .50 Contact Hour)

9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session

Presidential Ballroom D, Level 2

The final business of the 2017 House of Delegates will occur at this session. Delegates will be seated only if they signed in between 7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

(Speaker of the House) Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University; (Chair) Bradley C. Cannon, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, AACP

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break

Presidential Lobby, Level 2

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